Zhang, Owen (1456) - Zimmerle, Wayne (1648)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 04/03/2017

Round 5 [Murrel]


1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.f4 The Sicilian Grand Prix Attack
3...e6 4.Nf3 a6 5.a4 required if White wants to play Bc4.
[A frequently played alternative is
5.g3 followed by fianchettoing the f1-Bishop aiming at d5.]
5...b6
[Black had an opportunity to play the freeing move
5...d5 which is no longer available after Bc4.]
6.Bc4 Bb7 7.O-O Nd4 8.d3 h5 9.Nxd4
[while this capture is OK but I much prefer
9.Be3 completing development.
If 9...Nxf3+ 10.Qxf3 develops the Queen while playing aditional pressure on d5 and f7.There is an old saying "to take is a mistake" which means that the recapture usually brings an enemy piece forward into play.]
9...cxd4 10.Ne2 Bc5 11.Kh1 is too passive and tosses away an opening advantage, In this position the King is safer on g1 than h1 because the c5-Bishop is blocked by a pawn that White controls while Black controls the possible opening of the b7-h1 diagonal with the potential lever of f5.
[11.Qe1 with Qg3 attacking g7]
[11.Bd2 developing the last minor piece]
[and 11.f5 opening lines on the Black King are all better alternatives.]
11...h4 12.Ng1
[12.h3 stops Black'sinitiative against the King.]
12...Qf6
[Black misses a chance to break open the White center to advantage of the b7-Bishop.
12...d5]
13.Qg4
[13.f5 would open Black's center for his f1-Rook.
13...e5 would be met by
14.Nh3 threatening Bg5.]
13...Nh6 14.Qg5 O-O-O 15.Nh3 Rdg8 16.a5 b5? missing the watchful eye of the Queen.
17.Qxc5+ Bc6 18.Bb3
[I liked the attack with
18.Bxb5 axb5 19.a6 but Fritz agrees with Owen.]
18...g6 19.Qg5 White is a piece ahead and so wants to trade Queens.
19...Qg7 20.Qxh4 removing the Black pawn opens the line to the King and is dangerous.
20...f6 21.Qg3 Nf7 22.c3 dxc3 23.Re1 just recapturing and advancing the pawns on the Black King would be better.White is playing on the side of the board where Black is strongest instead of playing against Black's weaknesses.
23...f5 24.e5 Rh5 Black wants to double or triple on the h-file where the Knight and pawn are pinned.
25.Ng5 Kg1 unpinning or even d4-d5 would be better plans.
25...Rgh8 The h-pawn is now toast and cannot be saved.Nf3 seems White's best hope to survive a now boiling attack.
26.h3? forgetting that the g2-pawn is pinned and now White must give up his Queen for a Rook and Black has regained the position with a strong attack.
26...Nxg5 27.fxg5 Rxh3+ 28.Qxh3 Rxh3+ 29.Kg1 Rxd3 30.Bc2 cxb2 31.Bxb2 White's Queen Bishop and Queen Rook finally enter the game.
31...Rd2 32.Rac1 Rxg2+ 33.Kf1 Qh7 34.Bd4 Qh1+ 35.Bg1 Qxg1#


0-1

Leali, Mike (1863) - Zimmerle, Wayne (1648)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travellodge), 04/10/2017

Round 1 [Murrel]


1.e4 e6 2.f4 Not your usual French Defense!
2...b6 3.d4 Bb7 4.Bd3 Nf6 5.Qe2 Nc6 6.c3 Qe7 7.Nf3 O-O-O 8.a4 d5 9.e5 Ne4 10.Nbd2
[The e-pawn is poisoned.
10.Bxe4 dxe4 11.Qxe4 Nxd4 should win for Black.]
10...Nxd2 11.Bxd2 f6 12.b4 Castling on the opposite sides usually leads to pawn storms where the first to attack the opponent's King will win.But here the weather is calm on the King side of the board.
12...fxe5 13.fxe5 h6 Bg5 skewering the Queen to the Rook was threatened.
14.a5 Kb8 15.axb6 Also available to White is a6 or Bg6 both of which delay the Q-side exchange for a move but cramp Black's ability to find good moves.
15...cxb6 16.O-O g5 Black starts his counter-punch.The value of the missed Bg6 is now apparent.
17.Ne1 I like the idea of Ne1-c2-a3-b5
17...Rd7 18.Qg4 stalling Black's push back.
18...Bg7 19.Bg6 Rf8 20.Nd3 Rxf1
[Backtracking with the Rook
20...Rdd8 seems preferable to given White control of the only open file]
21.Rxf1 Nd8 22.Qh5 Bc8
[22...Rc7]
23.h4 gxh4 24.Bxh6
[24.Be1 and recapturing the h4-pawn keeps the attack rolling a little better as there are more attacking pieces on the board.]
24...Bxh6 25.Qxh6 These exchanges have returned the game to even according to Fritz.
25...Qg7 26.Qg5 Nf7
[26...Ba6]
27.Qf6 Nd8 28.Nf4 Qxf6 29.exf6 Rc7 30.Rf3 Nf7 the losing move.
31.Bxf7 Rxf7 Black was already constrained by the presence of the passed pawn, but these exchange assures that Black must part with material to stop it.
32.Ng6 Kc7 33.Ne5 Rf8 34.f7 h3 35.gxh3 Ba6 36.Ng6 Be2 37.Nxf8 Bxf3 38.Nxe6


1-0

Crum, Randy (1500) - Sye, David (1748)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 2017

Round 1 [Murrel]


1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 c5 After faking a NimzoIndian Black settles on the Modern Benoni
4.d5 exd5 5.cxd5 d6 6.e4 g6 7.Bb5+ Nbd7 8.Bg5 a6 9.Bxd7+ Bxd7 10.Nge2 h6 11.Bd2
[11.Bf4 is better.Every move should have a touch of poison - that is, every move should have a threat. If White's Bishop is on f4, Black will find it harder to fianchetto his K-Bishop.The move played lacks a threat.]
11...b5 12.Ng3 Bg7 13.O-O O-O 14.Bf4 Qb6 15.Qd2 Kh7 16.h3 Rfe8 17.Rae1
[Wrong Rook.
17.f3 is fine since c4+ is no threat as Black answers with Be3 Black wants to play b4, not c4, and so playing c4 actually hinders his progress.]
17...b4 18.Na4 Ooops this is not helpful!
18...Bxa4 19.e5 dxe5 20.Bxe5
[20.Rxe5 to make room on e8 for the f8-Rook]
20...Bb5 21.Bxf6 Qxf6 22.Rxe8 Rxe8 23.Re1
[23.Rc1 is needed. White should not trade pieces when behind materially.]
23...Rxe1+ 24.Qxe1 Qxb2 25.d6 Qa1 26.Qxa1 Bxa1 27.Ne4 Bd4 A competitive game until the loose pieces dropped off.


0-1

Zhang, Owen (1456) - Liu, Lawrence (1773)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 2017

Round 1 [Murrel]


1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Be7 Hungarian Defense
4.O-O is the book move here.Castling is a good alternative.
4...Nf6 5.Nc3 d6 6.h3 O-O 7.d3 h6
[7...Na5]
8.Be3 a6 9.a4 Bd7 10.d4 b6 11.dxe5 Releasing the tension. White is slightly better and so should try to build an attack.
11...Nxe5 12.Nxe5 dxe5 13.Qe2 a5 14.Rad1 Qc8 15.Nd5 Re8 16.Qd2
[Giving away the a-pawn. White has many ways to save the pawn. Bb3 certainly works, but White could also play
16.Qf3 Bxa4 17.Bxh6 with an attack.
17...gxh6 18.Nxf6 Bxf6 19.Qxf6 with Rd3 & Rg3 to follow.]
16...Bxa4 17.Nxf6+ Bxf6 18.Qd5 Rf8 19.b3 Be8 20.Qd2
[White should grab the initiative with
20.f4 exf4 21.e5]
20...Bc6 21.Bd5 Qb7 22.Qe2 Rfd8 23.Bxc6 Qxc6 This exchange of pieces brings Black's Queen into the game, menacing White's pawns.
24.Qg4 Be7 25.Qg3 This move has to be a mistake. White drops at least 1 more pawn and his attck on g7 can be easily handled by Bf8.
25...Rxd1 26.Rxd1 Qf6
[Black is a pawn ahead and so wishes to trade off the Queens, but after
26...Qxc2 27.Rd7 Bf8 Black continues to munch pawns.]
27.Rd7 Bd6 Trapping the Rook.
28.h4
[28.Qg4]
28...a4 Black should either go after the Rook with Qe6 or attempt to get a passed pawn with b4 first followed by a5 with a passed pawn after the trade. This trading of the potential passer should lengthen the game.
29.bxa4 Rxa4 30.Qg4 Rc4 31.Qe2 Rxe4 32.Qb5 Rb4 33.Qc6 e4
[This zwischenzug is not needed.
33...Rb1+ 34.Kh2 Qxh4# is mate.]
34.g3 Rb1+ 35.Kg2 Qf3 36.Kh3 Rh1#

0-1

Leali, Mike (1863) - Lonn, Adam (1580)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 04/24/2017

Round 2 [Murrel]


1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 This is the Exchange Variation of the Caro Kahn. Other more common lines are 3.e5 and 3.Nc3
3...cxd5 4.Nf3
[4.c4 is the famed Botvinnik-Panov Attack!]
4...Bg4 Knights before Bishops with either Nc6 or Nf6 is more usual here.
5.Be2 e6 6.O-O Bd6 7.h3 Bh5 8.Re1 Nf6 9.c3 O-O The opening has been pretty quiet and pretty even.
10.Ne5 an effort to liven things up before a draw sets in.
10...Bxe2 11.Rxe2 An unusual choice. Qxe2 seems more natural. Rooks usually need to unite on the back rank for defense of the King.
11...Qc7 12.Nd3 Nc6 13.Nd2 b5 14.a3 Nd2-b3-c5 creating a strong point with the c5-Knight Outpost is a good alternative.
14...a5 15.Nf3 b4 16.axb4 axb4 17.Rxa8 Rxa8 18.cxb4 Nxb4 19.Nxb4 Bxb4 This exchange creates an outside passed pawn for White, but it also creates a weak isolated Queen Pawn in the center.
20.Rc2 Qb6 21.Qd3 h6 22.g3 Ne4 23.Kg2 Be7 24.Nd2 Nd6 25.Nf3 Bf6 26.Be3 Ra4 There has been a lot of maneuvering with little consequence.
27.Ne5
[Perhaps White should try
27.Rc3 hoping to tempt Black with the pawn offer.
27...Qxb2 28.Rb3 threatening both the Queen and checkmate!]
27...Qb7 28.f3 Rb4 29.Qc3 Rb3 30.Qd2
[A blunder dropping a piece.
30.Qc6 and the cat & mouse game continues.) 30...Bxe5 31.dxe5 Nc4 ({White resigned as everything falls after Nc4 32.Rxc4 dxc4 33.Qd8+ Kh7 and White can't guard both the Bishop and f3.]


0-1

Garrett, Daniel (1817) - Zhang, Owen (1456)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 2017

Round 2 [Murrel]


1.Nf3 d5 2.c4 Nf6 The Reti Gambit Declined. More common is just c6 or e6, reinforcing the center. Black can then wait for White to fianchetto his KB before playing dxc4.
3.cxd5 Nxd5 4.e4 Nf6 5.Nc3 Nc6 This move is not usually good in most c4 or d4 games as the c-pawn needs to be played out to c5 or c6
6.d4 And White owns the center with a pair of center pawns which threaten to advance against the defenceless Knights.
6...Bg4
[with c6 & d6 unavailable here Black should play
6...e6]
7.Be3
[White misses a Queen sacrifice with
7.d5 Ne5 8.Nxe5 Bxd1 9.Bb5+ c6 10.dxc6 a6 11.c7+ axb5 12.cxd8=Q+ Rxd8 13.Nxd1 and White is a piece and Black is still undeveloped.]
7...e6 8.a3 a6 9.Be2 Bxf3 10.Bxf3 This exchange helped White. Black should develop with Qd7.
10...e5 Be7 & castles are needed.
11.d5 Ne7 12.O-O Ng6 13.g3 Bd6 14.Bg2 Qd7 15.h3 h5 16.f4 h4 17.f5 Ne7 18.g4 The pawn play by both sides here has been excellent.
18...c6 But the board has changed. Now Black should continue with Q-siide castling and so the text is incorrect.
19.Bg5
[White could also play to take advantage of the newly weak dark squares with
19.Na4]
19...cxd5 20.Bxf6 gxf6 21.Nxd5 Bc5+ 22.Kh1 Nxd5 23.exd5 Qd6
[23...Bd4]
24.Qb3 Bb6 25.Rac1 Ke7 26.Rc2 Rhc8 27.Rfc1 Kd8 28.Rc6 bxc6 29.Qxb6+ Qc7 30.Qf2 Qd6
[30...Qa7 31.Qxh4 cxd5 32.Re1 Rab8 33.Qxf6+ Qe7 34.Qxa6 Rxb2 35.Bxd5 Rcc2 and all White has is a perpetual check beginning with
36.Qa8+ Kd7 37.Qa4+ Kd8 38.Qa8+ etc.]
31.dxc6 Ke7
[31...Rab8]
32.c7 The line after 32.c7 was reviewed heavily during the post game analysis. Wayne suggested Rab8 which almost holds. But Rc6 saves the day for White and Black can't stop the carnage after Qf1+ 34.Kh2 Rb7 35.Qxh4 and Qxf6 will be fatal.
32...Qd4 33.Qxd4 exd4 34.Bxa8 Rxa8 35.c8=Q Rxc8 36.Rxc8 and the game is essentially over.
36...Kd6 37.Kg2 Ke5 38.Kf3 a5 39.Rc5+ Kd6 40.Rxa5 d3 41.Ke3 Kc6 42.Kxd3 Kb6 43.b4 Kc6 44.Ra6+ Kb5 45.Rxf6 Ka4 46.Ra6+ Kb5 47.Ra5+ Kb6 48.Ke4 f6 49.Kd5 Kc7 50.Ke6 Kc6 51.Kxf6 Kd7 52.Kg7 Ke7 53.Ra6 Ke8 54.Ra7 Kd8 55.f6 Kc8 56.f7 Kb8 57.Re7 Kc8 58.f8=Q#


1-0

Suarez, Ron (1533) - Taylor, Tom (1820)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 04/10/2017


1.c4 e5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.Nf3 A27 English Opening: King's English Variation, Three Knights System
3...g6 4.d4 exd4 5.Nxd4 Bg7 6.Nxc6 bxc6 7.Qc2 Ne7 8.g3 O-O 9.Bg2 Rb8 10.O-O The opening phase seems over. Both fianchettoed Bishops are good. Black has more center pawns and will try to play d5. The game should be even.
10...Bb7 11.Be3 a6 12.Rfd1 Nf5 13.Bc1 Qe7 14.e3 Rfd8 15.Rb1 Qe5 16.Ne2 d6 17.b4 c5 18.Bxb7 Rxb7 19.Bb2 Qe7 20.Bxg7 Kxg7 21.bxc5 Rxb1 22.Qxb1 dxc5 23.Qb2+ Kg8 24.Rc1 0.11 > -1.07 Mistake. Best move was Rxd8+.
[24.Rxd8+ Qxd8 25.Nc3 Nd6 26.Qb3 Kg7 27.Nd5 c6 28.Qc3+ f6 29.Nf4 Qd7 30.Qc2 Kf7]
24...Nxe3 25.Qc3 -0.94 > -1.51 Inaccuracy. Best move was Nf4.
[25.Nf4 Nd1]
25.fxe3 Qxe3+ 26.Kf1 Rd2 27.Qb8+ Kg7 28.Re1 Qf3+ 29.Kg1 Rxe2 30.Qxe2 Qb3 and Black should win. However, White still has play. QvQ games often draw regardless of pawn count.
25...Nf5 26.Re1 Qd6 -1.61 > -0.49 Mistake.Best move was Nd4.
[Correct is
26...Nd4 27.Nxd4 cxd4 28.Qd2 Qd6 and Black is winning.]
27.Nf4 Qd2 -0.76 > 6.60 Blunder. Best move was Qd4.
[27...Qd4 28.Qb3 Qd2 29.Rf1 Qa5 30.Qb7 Qb6 31.Qe4 Rd4 32.Qe8+ Kg7 33.Qe5+ Qf6 34.Qxc5]
28.Re8+ Removing the Defender! Black resigns.


1-0

Lonn, Adam (1580) - Garrett, Daniel (1817)
2017 Peoria Championship, 2017

Round 2 [Murrel]


1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.cxd5 Nxd5 5.e4 Nxc3 6.bxc3 Bg7 And we have a Grunfeld Defense
7.Nf3 the Knight is usually developed via e2 to avoid the Bg4 pin.
7...O-O 8.Be2 Bg4 9.Rb1 Removing the Rook from the diagonal and also attacking b7.
9...c5 10.Rxb7 The pawn is not free, White trades his c & d pawns for Black's b & c pawns. However it does even up the pawn structures and favors a more drawish outcome.
10...Bxf3 11.Bxf3 cxd4 12.cxd4 Bxd4 13.O-O With both sides castled the opening comes to an end. Pawn structures are even but White has a Bishop pair and a small advantage in development.
13...Nc6 14.Ba3 Re8 15.Be2
[15.Qa4 is begging to be played.]
15...Rb8 16.Qb1 Qa5 17.Bc1 Bb6 18.Rxb8 Rxb8 19.Qc2 Nd4 20.Qc4 Nxe2+ eliminating the Bishop pair. Black also has more space and so a slight advantage.
21.Qxe2 Bd4 22.Qc2 Qb6 23.Kh1 Bg7
[23...Qb1 24.Qxb1 Rxb1 leaves Black with tactical opportunities.]
24.Be3 Qa5 25.Rb1 Rxb1+ 26.Qxb1 h6 27.h3 Kh7 28.f3 a6 29.Bf4 Be5 30.Bxe5 Qxe5 31.Qb3 Kg7 32.a3 a5 33.a4 Qd4 34.Qb5 Qb4 35.Kh2 White cannot take as Black Queens first with check.
35...Kf6 36.Kg3
[This innocent looking move is now a blunder. Everything changed since the Black King can now move into the square of the White pawn.
36.Qxb4 axb4 37.a5 almost draws by force as both passers Queen and the Kings are safely hidden with all pawns on the same side of the board.]
36...Qxb5 37.axb5 Ke6 38.Kf4 a4 39.b6 Kd6

0-1

Liu, Lawrence (1798) - Zimmerle, Wayne (1648)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 05/01/2017

Round 2 [Murrel]


1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.Nge2 This sneaky continuation is called the Chameleon Variation
3...g6 4.d4 cxd4 5.Nxd4 Now the Chameleon shows it's true colors - this is an Accelerated Dragon
5...Bg7 6.Be3 a6 Nf6 would be book here
7.f4 f3 followed by g4 & h4-h5 leads to the standard Yugoslav Attack against the Accelerated Dragon
7...d6 8.Qd2 Nf6 9.O-O-O Ng4 10.Nxc6 bxc6 11.Kb1 Nxe3 12.Qxe3 and Black has the Bishop pair
12...O-O 13.Bc4 Rb8 14.a3 Qa5 15.Ka2 c5 16.Rb1 Bb7 17.Rhd1 Bc6 18.Nd5 Bxd5 19.Rxd5 Rb7 20.b3 Rfb8 21.e5 Qc7 22.Rbd1 Rb6 23.h4 a5 24.g4 a4 Makes it hard for Black to gain traction.
24...a4 25.g5
[25.h5 the g-pawn does not promote White's attack, it in fact inhibits it.]
25...axb3 26.cxb3 Qa7
[26...Ra8]
27.Rb1 Ra8 28.Qc1 28.a4 Qxa4+ 29.bxa4 Rxa4+ 30.Qa3 Rxa3+ 31.Kxa3 Rxb1 32.exd6 exd6 33.Rb4 leads to a Bishop of Oppositre Colors ending with a slight edge to White due to the passed pawn.
28...Bf8 29.Rd3 e6 30.exd6 Rxd6 31.a4 Rxd3 32.Bxd3 Rd8 33.Bc4 Rd4 34.Qe3 Qd7 35.Rb2 Bg7 36.Rh2 White cannot let the Black Rook safely reach his back row due to the Bishop-Rook mate on a1
[36.Be2 is probably best.]
36...Rd1 37.Rb2 Bd4 No sense taking the Rook immediately when you can poke at the Queen. Qd2 is actually White's best gettng a Rook for the Queen.
38.Qe2 Bxb2 Notice the difference between taking the Rook now and a move sooner. Now White cannot recapture as it would drop the Queen.
39.Bb5 Qd4 40.Qxb2 Rd2 41.Qxd2 Qxd2 42.Kb1 Qb4


0-1

Taylor, Tom (1820) - Sye, David (1748)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 05/08/2017

Round 3 [Murrel]


1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 Nc6 3.g3 g6 4.Bg2 Bg7 5.d3 We have a Closed Sicilian
5...Rb8 6.Be3 d6 7.Qd2 b5 Black's play is Reminescient of the Chinese Dragon
8.Nge2 b4 9.Nd1 Nd4 10.O-O e6 11.c3 Nxe2+ 12.Qxe2 bxc3 13.bxc3 Ba6 14.Qd2 Qa5 15.Re1 Ne7 16.Rc1 O-O 17.c4 Qa3 18.Bf1 White seems to be playing very cautiously moving pieces to the back row on defense. Bf4 & Bh6 offer sharper play. Black has a mild advantage due to his more active pieces.
18...Rb6 19.Rc2 Nc6 20.Qc1 Qxc1 21.Rxc1 Nd4 22.Kg2 f5 23.f3 Bb7 24.Be2 fxe4 25.dxe4 d5 26.cxd5 exd5 27.Bxd4 Bxd4 28.exd5 Bxd5 29.Bc4 Bxc4 30.Rxc4 Ra6
[30...Rb1]
31.Rc2 Ra3 32.f4 Rf6 33.Ree2 Kf7 34.Nf2 Re6 35.Ne4 h6 36.Nf2
[36.Nxc5 doesn't work due to
36...Rxe2+ 37.Rxe2 Bxc5]
36...Rxe2 37.Rxe2 Bxf2 38.Kxf2 Rc3 39.Re3 Rc2+ 40.Re2 Rxe2+ 41.Kxe2 The Rook ending was drawn and so is this King & pawn ending.
41...Ke6 42.Kd3 Kd5 43.a4 c4+ 44.Kc3 h5 The ending has become a counting contest. If the Black King breaks for h2, who Queens first? Currently the answer is that it's a tie, both Queen.
45.a5 Ke4 a6 or Kc5 holds. But Black miscounts. The one square the a-pawn moved makes the difference.
46.Kxc4 Kf3 47.Kb5 Kg2 48.Ka6 Kxh2 49.Kxa7 Kxg3 50.Kb6 h4 51.a6 h3 52.a7 h2
[An interesting alternate ending is
52...Kg2 53.a8=Q+ Kg1 54.Qf3 h2 55.Qg3 Kh1 56.Qf2 and the pawn must move allowing Qf1 mate.]
53.a8=Q And White's Queen stops Black's pawn.


1-0

Zhang, Owen (1456) - Leali, Michael (1863)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 05/08/2017

Round 3 [Murrel]


1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 d6 3.f4 Nf6 4.Nf3 g6 5.Bc4 Bg7 6.O-O
[An interesting line is
6.e5 dxe5 7.fxe5 Ng4 8.e6 with problems for Black.]
6...Nc6 7.d3 Bg4 8.Be3
[8.Bxf7+ Kxf7 9.Ng5+ And Qxg4 wins a pawn for White and disrupts the Black King.]
8...O-O 9.Qe1 a6 10.a4 Qb6 Black is not threatening the b2-pawn as Bb3 would then trap the Queen with Ra2
11.h3 Bxf3 12.Rxf3 Nb4 13.Bb3 Nxd3 14.cxd3
[14.Bxf7+ maintains the material balance.]
14...Qxb3 15.f5 b5 16.axb5
[16.Qd2]
16...axb5 17.Rxa8 Rxa8 18.Qd2 b4 19.Ne2 Nd7 20.d4 Qc4 21.dxc5 White shouldn't help Black by trading pieces.
21...Nxc5 22.Bxc5 Qxc5 23.Kh1 Ra1 24.Kh2 Be5 25.g3 Ra2 26.fxg6 hxg6 27.Rb3 Wrong for many reasons, most important is the following checkmate.
27...Qf2 28.Kh1 Ra1 29.Qc1 Rxc1 30.Nxc1 Bd4 31.Ne2 Qxe2 32.Rxb4 Qf1 33.Kh2 Qg1


0-1

Zimmerle, Wayne (1648) - Garrett, Daniel (1817)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 05/08/2017

Round 4 [Murrel]


1.b4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Bb2 Bg7 4.Nc3 O-O 5.Nf3 b6 6.e3 Bb7 7.Rc1 d5 8.d4 e6 9.c5 c6 10.Bd3 a5 11.a3 axb4 12.axb4 bxc5 13.bxc5 Nbd7 14.O-O Ba6 This reminds me of a Benko Gambit without the Gambit!
15.Ra1 Bxd3 16.Qxd3 Qc7 17.h3 Rfb8 18.Rxa8 Rxa8 19.Ra1 Rxa1 20.Bxa1 Qa5 21.Qb1
[21.Bb2 This Bishop needs room to breathe.]
21...h6 22.Ne2 inviting the Black Knight to occupy e4.
22...Ne4 23.Qc1 Ndxc5 This pawn was going to fall anyway.
24.Nc3 missing the fork.
24...Nb3 25.Qb2 Qxa1 26.Qxa1 Nxa1 27.Na4 Nb3 28.Ne1 Nf6 29.Nd3 Nd7 30.Kf1 e5 This activates an exchange that creates a passed pawn for Black.
31.dxe5 Bxe5 32.Nxe5 Nxe5 33.Nc3 f5 34.Ke2 Kf7 35.f4 Nd7 36.g4 Now fxg4 37.hxg4 h5 will create a second passer on the h-file.
36...Ke6 37.Kd3 Ndc5 38.Kc2 Na5 39.Ne2 Nc4 40.Nd4 Kd6 41.g5 h5 42.Nf3 Nxe3 43.Kd2 Nc4 44.Ke2 Ne6 45.Nh4 Nxf4 46.Kf3 Nxh3 47.Nxf5 gxf5 48.g6 Ne5


0-1

Pete McConaghie (1832) - Gus Jennetten (1676)
2017 Peoria Championship (Rodeway Inn), 2017

Round 1 [Murrel]


1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Nf6 4.O-O Be7 The Hungarian Defense builds a wall and dares White to try and knock it down.
5.d3 O-O 6.c3 d6 7.b4 a6 8.a4 Rb8 9.a5 Bd7 10.Qb3 h6 11.Re1 Qc8 12.d4 exd4 13.cxd4 Qd8 14.Ba3 b5 15.Bd3 Bg4 16.Nbd2 d5 17.e5 Ne4 18.Qb2
[18.Bxe4 seems to solve all White's problems.]
18...Nxa5 19.Nxe4 dxe4 20.Bxe4 Nc4 21.Qc3 Nb6 There should be no reason to move this well placed Knight.
22.Rac1 Nd5 23.Bxd5 Qxd5 24.Nd2 Bg5 25.f3 Bxd2 26.Qxd2 Bxf3
[26...Be6 There is no need to panic. Material is equal and Bishops of the opposite color are on the board.Black does not pick up the a3-Bishop since Qxf3 is not check.]
27.gxf3 Qxf3 28.Rc3 Qd5 29.Rg3 Rb6 30.Bb2 f5 31.Qf4 g5 32.Qf3
[32.h4]
32...Qxf3 33.Rxf3 Rc6 34.e6 f4 35.Bc3 Re8 36.d5 Rd6 37.Rd3 Kf8 38.Be5 Rexe6 39.Bxd6+ Rxd6 40.Rc1 Ke7 41.Rxc7+ Kd8 42.Ra7 Kc8 43.Kf2 Kb8 44.Rh7 a5 45.bxa5 b4 46.Kf3 Ra6 47.Rb3 Kc8 48.Rxb4 Rxa5 49.Ke4 Ra2 50.Rxh6 Re2+ 51.Kf3 Re3+ 52.Kg4 f3 53.Rf6 f2 54.Rxf2 Kd7 55.Rf6 Re1 56.Rb7+ Kc8 57.Rh7 Re4+

1-0

Wayne Zimmerle (1648) - Adam Lonn (1560)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 05/15/2017

Round 3


1.b4 b5 I know Wayne wants to play the Polish because, well just because. But no where was I able to find Adam's first move. I guess our opening phase is just one-half move long!
2.Bb2 a5 3.bxa5 Rxa5 4.e3 c6 5.c4 bxc4 6.Bxc4 d5 7.Be2 Bf5 8.Nf3 h6 9.h3 Nd7 10.g4 Until now all has been weird but somewhat logical. White had only to finish development and he would hold a significant advantage since Black has failed to develop his K-side pieces. Nc3 & Nd4 come to mind with a quick castle tossed in. g4 is an unwarranted weaking of the White King.
10...Bh7 11.Nd4 Qc7 12.Nc3 Ngf6 13.Rc1 e6 14.Ncb5 The first major tactic of the game.
14...Rxb5 15.Nxb5 Qb7 16.Qa4 cxb5 17.Bxb5 Qxb5 is better as after the Queen exchange the Black King will be vulnerable to the White Rook on the back row.
17...Bd6 18.Bxf6 gxf6
[Better to give up this Knight and continue with
18...O-O and get the King to safety.]
19.Bxd7 Ke7 20.Bc6 Qb2 21.O-O f5 22.Qa7 Kf8 23.Bd7 fxg4 24.Rc8 Kg7 25.Bxe6 Rxc8 26.Qxf7 Kh8 27.Bxc8 Qe5 28.f4
[28.Qf4 takes the wind out of the counter attack.]
28...gxf3 29.Rxf3 White misses that the White-squared Black Bishop hidding h8 closes off the White King's escape.
29...Qh2 30.Kf1 Bd3 31.Ke1 Qe2


0-1

Crum, Randy (1500) - Jennetten, Gus (1692)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 06/05/2017

Round 5 [Murrel]


1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 Bg7 4.e4 d6 Kings Indian Defense
5.Bd3 e5 6.Nge2 A sideline, the main line continues with d5.
6...Nc6 this appears to be ok, but Usually should not be placed on c6 unless it is part of opening prep.
7.d5 Ne7 8.Bg5 O-O 9.O-O Nd7 10.Rc1 f5 11.exf5 gxf5 12.Ng3 h6 Drops a pwan. Better is e4 & Ne5
13.Bxe7 Qxe7 14.Nxf5 Qg5 15.h4 Qf6 16.Nxg7 Qxg7 17.Qh5 Nc5 18.Qe2 Bh3 19.Be4
[Dropping the exchange with
19.g3 Bxf1 would leave White only an exchange for a pawn down and he could play on.]
19...Nxe4 20.Qxe4 Rf4 White resigns


0-1

Suarez, Ron (1533) - Crum, Randy (1500)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 05/22/2017

Round 4


1.c4 Nf6 2.Nc3 e6 3.e4 Its an English, but it should be played like a Marozcy Bind
3...d6 In the last 2 moves Black has blocked both of his Bishops. He should be trying c6 & d5 to beak White's lock on the center.
4.Nf3 Nc6 5.d4 Be7 6.Be2 O-O 7.O-O d5 8.e5 Ne8 9.b3
[9.cxd5 exd5 10.Qb3 wins material.]
9...f6 10.Bb2 fxe5 11.dxe5 d4 12.Nb5 Bc5 13.Nbxd4 Nxd4 14.Nxd4 Rf4 15.Nf3 Bd7 16.Qd2 Rf5
[16...Rf7]
17.Rad1 Rf7 18.Ng5 Re7 19.Ne4 Bb6 20.c5 and the Bishop is trapped. A well played game.


1-0

McConaghie, Pete (1832) - Taylor, Tom (1820)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 2017


1.e4 d5 The Scandanavian, also called the Center Counter. Peorian John Lutes wrote an entire book about this opening.
2.exd5 Nf6 3.c4 e6 4.dxe6 Bxe6 this line is played as a gambit where Black has good piece development.
5.Nf3 Qe7 6.Qe2 Nc6 7.a3 We finally leave book. d4 is normal here.
7...O-O-O In the Scandinavian Black should always castle long if possible.
8.d3 Qd7 9.Be3 Bf5 10.d4 Bg4 11.d5 Ne5 12.Nxe5 Bxe2 13.Nxd7 Bxf1 14.Nxf6 Bxc4 15.Nd2 Bxd5 16.Nxd5 Rxd5 When the board has cleared, we noticed that Black has picked up a piece for a pawn!
17.O-O-O Bc5 18.Bxc5 Rxc5+ 19.Kb1 Rd8 20.Ne4 Now at least 1 set of Rooks will come off.


1-0

Leali, Mike (1863) - Garrett, Daniel (1814)
2017 Peoria Championship (Travelodge), 2017

Round 5


This is the final game of the playin rounds. Daniel has a half point lead, so Mike must win to advance. Daniel has draw odds. This may explain some of what follows.
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 a6 3.c4 e6 Sicilian O'Kelly Marozcy bind variation.
4.d4 cxd4 5.Nxd4 Qc7 More common is Nf6. This is the Kan Variation. It was used by Fischer in the last game of the 1972 Fischer-Spassky match to defeat Spassky. Peorian John Lutes wrote an entire book about this opening.
6.Be3 Nf6 7.f3 d5 8.exd5 exd5 9.Nd2 Nc3 seems better as it threatens d5. This move seems to ask Black to capture with a counter punch capture on c4.
9...Nc6 10.Rc1 Bd6 11.g3 I admit I don't understand this move or the next, but it definately moves the game away from a draw.
11...O-O 12.Kf2 Qe7 13.Bd3 Re8 14.Re1 The only move.14.Nf1 Bc4 15.Nc2 d4 16.Bd2 leaves White tied up with the Bishops pointed to his King side.
14...Bh3 15.Nxc6 bxc6 16.Bd4 Qd7 17.Qc2 h6 18.Nb3 dxc4 19.Qxc4 Rxe1 20.Rxe1 Be6 21.Qc3 Nd5 22.Qd2
[22.Qc2]
22...Bb4 23.Bc3 Nxc3 24.bxc3 Qa7+ 25.Kg2 Bxb3 26.cxb4 Bd5 27.Qe2 with a mate threat of ...28.Qe8+ Rxe8 29.Rxe8#
27...g6 28.a3 a5 29.Bc4 axb4 30.Bxd5 cxd5 31.axb4 White is hoping that the outside passed pawn will win.
31...Qa2 32.Kh3
[Not wanting
32.Qxa2 Rxa2+ Where Black gets his Rook behind the pawn
33.Kh3 Rb2]
32...Qxe2 33.Rxe2 Rb8 34.Rb2 Rb5 35.Kg4 Kg7 36.Kf4 Kf6 37.Ke3 Ke5 38.Kd3 d4 39.Kc4 Rd5 40.b5
[40.f4+ driving the King back
40...Kd6 41.Ra2 Rh5 42.h4 d3 43.Kxd3 favors White.]
40...d3 41.Rd2 Rd4+ 42.Kc5 Rd5+ 43.Kc6 Rd6+ 44.Kc7 Rd4 45.b6 Rc4+ 46.Kd7 Rb4 47.Kc6
[a careless move.
47.Kc7 holds as the King covers the Queening square. Now that will require an extra tempo.]
47...Kd4 48.b7 Ke3 49.Rd1 Ke2 50.Rc1 d2 51.Rc2 Ke1 52.Rxd2 Kxd2 53.Kc7 Ke3 54.f4 Kf2 55.b8=Q Rxb8 56.Kxb8 Now Black wins as White's King is too far away.
56...Kg2 57.g4 Kxh2 58.Kc7 Kg3 59.g5 h5


0-1

Mc Conaghie, Peter (1865) - Garrett, Daniel (1857)
2017 Peoria Championship Finals (Travelodge), 2017

Round 1


1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 a6 Black again with the O'Kelly variation of the Sicilian
3.c3 g6 4.Be2 A quiet move that gives Black a tempo. It often transposes to other lines.
4...Bg7 5.d4 cxd4 6.cxd4 d5 7.e5 Bg4 8.O-O e6 9.h3 With the light squared Bishop locked away on the King side I would prefer Qb3 here.
9...Bxf3 10.Bxf3 Ne7 11.g4 to keep the Night off f5, but it also weakens the King position.
11...O-O 12.Na3 Nd7 13.Bd2 Nc6 14.Nc2 f6 I thought this might be a mistake when I first looked at it as the e6-pawn is backward on an open file but after lookig at some tactics it deserves an exclam! some lines win a piece for lack and he even has e5 is some lines.
15.exf6 Qxf6 16.Bg2 Nxd4 17.Nxd4 Qxd4 18.Bc3 Qxd1 19.Raxd1 Bxc3 20.bxc3 Rac8 21.Rfe1 Kf7 22.Re3
[22.c4 Rxc4 23.Rxe6 Kxe6 24.Bxd5 holds for White.]
22...g5 the tactic is still there!
23.Bf1 Nf6 24.f3 Rc6 25.Rb1 b5 26.a4 Rfc8 27.axb5 axb5 28.Rxb5
[28.Rb3]
28...Rxc3 29.Rxc3 Rxc3 30.Rb7+ Kg6 31.Kf2 e5 32.Re7 e4 33.Be2 Ra3 34.Bd1 White would be better off facing a single pawn. He should be trading pawns {When behind trade pawns, not pieces.
34...Ra2+ 35.Ke3
[35.Ke1 Once the Bishop disappears the game is essentially over.]
35...d4+ 36.Kxd4 Rd2+ 37.Ke5 Rd5+ 38.Ke6 Rxd1 39.fxe4 Nxe4 40.Ke5 Nf6 41.Ra7 Rd3 42.Ra6 Re3+ 43.Kd4 Rxh3 44.Ke5 Re3+ 45.Kd4 Re4+ 46.Kd3 Rxg4

0-1