Bill Naff (2000) - Wayne Zimmerle (1715)
Peoria City Championship, 07/12/2009


1.e4 e6 2.d4 d6 ECO lists this line under C00, but has no lines with 2...d6. I'll call the opening the Rope-A-Dope Opening in honor of Muhammad Ali-George frazier bout in which Ali tried only the dull and dodge Frazier's blows. This seems to be what Wayne tries to do in this game.
3.Nf3 Ne7 4.Bd3 Ng6 5.Nc3 Be7 6.Be3 c6 7.Qd2 Nd7 8.O-O O-O 9.Rad1 Re8 10.Rfe1 Ndf8 11.a3 Bill has developed without opposition, but lacks targets. He decides to wit and let Wayne run out of moves.
11...b6 12.Ng5 Bd7 13.f4 White has a big advantage in space, but Black still has moves to juggle his pieces behind the lines. An advantage in space is meaningless unless it can be converted into something more tangible.
13...f6 14.Nf3 f5 Finally, engagement!
15.Bf2 fxe4 16.Nxe4 d5 Sadly, this seems like it mey be the best move, although it leaves a permanent backward pawn, vulnerable on e6. Perhaps another do nothing move like a6 should be played to not weaken the pawns. Pawn can't move backward so such a waiting move may be better.
17.Ng3 c5 challenging White's center.
18.c3 cxd4 The tension serves Black as it stops White from consolidating his pieces in the center.
19.cxd4 Rc8 20.Re2 Qc7 21.Nh5 Bd6 22.Bg3 Ne7 23.Rde1 Nf5 24.Bf2 Ng6 25.g3 Rf8 Until now all the jockeying for position has been somewhat equal, White with a slightly better position, but Black parrying the threats. Finally Black slips up and the weak backward pawn on the half open file is the victim. Rf8 robs Black of his safety net with of Nf8.
26.Ng5 Rce8 27.Nxe6 Bxe6 28.Rxe6 Rxe6 29.Rxe6 Qd7 30.Qe1 Rf7 31.Re8+ Bf8 Both daark squared Bishops are just big pawns.
32.Qe6 Qxe6 33.Rxe6 Nge7 34.h3 Not needed, g4 can be played at once.
34...Nc8 35.g4 Nfd6 36.f5 Re7 37.Nf4 Eyeing the hapless d5 Pawn.
37...Nc4 A mistake. I know it's ugly, but Black needs to play Rxe6, even if the Knight gets a wonderful post. Now White gets the best of all worlds - the Pawn on e4 and his dark square Bishop are both freed and even his Rook now has more squares to chose from. Black is lost with best play in any case - the task now is to make it as hard as possible fro White to findd the right way to exploit the situation and hope for a mistake.
38.Bxc4 dxc4 39.Rc6 Re4 40.Ne6 Nd6 Ooops - Ne7 was necessary.
41.Nxf8 Nxf5 Desparado!
42.gxf5 Kxf8 43.Rxc4 Black could play a few more moves, but why?


1-0

Leali, Mike (1908) - Naff, Bill (2000)
Peoria City Championship, 06/29/2009


1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 g6 5.Nc3 Nf6 6.Be3 Bg7 7.Be2 O-O 8.Nb3 d6 9.Qd2 Be6 10.O-O White correctly castles K-side and plays the Classical Attack. Trying the Yugoslav Attack by castling Q-side or playing f3 and then castling Q-side at this juncture would be inviting disaster as his Knight has already left d4 and Black has gotten in Be6.
10...Ng4 Black wants to trade his Knight for a Bishop and secure the 2 Bishops advantage. The only way to avoid this is Bg5 and then Black can still force the exchange with Be5. Note that 12.f4 is bad for White after Qb6+ 13.Kh1 Bxc3 14.Qxc3 Nf2! and White must give up his Rook to avoid mate!
11.Bxg4 Bxg4 12.f3 Be6 13.f4 f5 Inviting exf5 Bxf5 when Black's Bishop pair will dominate the center.
14.Nd4 Bc4 15.Rf2 Rfe1 Qd7 Taking his foot off the gas - I like Nxd4 16.Bxd4 e5!, keeping the initiative.
16.exf5 Bxd4 17.Bxd4 Rxf5 18.b3 With Bishops of the opposite colors, White has nothing to fear with this move as he owns the dark squares that could become weak if Black still had his dark square Bishop.
18...Be6 The Bishop has no good squares, but here he becomes a target as well as the backward pawn behind him. Best is probably Ba6 to be followed by b6 and Bb7 re-entering the game on the powerful long diagonal.
19.Re1 Raf8 20.Qe3 Nxd4 21.Qxd4 White has secured a dominating center position.
21...d5 Black doesn't worry aout the loose Pawn on a7 as White would lose the more valuable f4 Pawn if he took it. I don't see any immediate negative continuation, but I don't like this move as it places another Pawn on the color of the Bishop, a more permanent disadvantage. I like a6 better as it solves the loose Pawn problem and takes away a square from the Knight.
22.Qe3 R5f6 23.Ne2 Bf7 Bf5 24.Nd4 Re8 25.h3 Qd6 26.f5 Kg7 27.g4 e5 28.Ne2 fxe6! d4 29.Qg3 Now the game has changed White has to scramble to find defensive places for his pieces.
29...g5 30.Nc1 White is looking for a defensive setup. The Knight is headed to d3, but he really belongs on e4. The best way to get there is Qd3 and Ng3-e4.
30...e4 31.Qxd6 Rxd6 32.Rfe2 Attacking the wrong Pawn. Its the d4 Pawn that can't be defended by the Bishop. Rd2 is the move.
32...Bd5 33.Rd2 Bc6 34.Ne2 Red8 35.Red1 d3 36.cxd3 Rxd3 37.Rxd3 Rxd3 38.Rxd3 exd3 39.Nc3 Kf6 40.Kf2 Ke5 41.Ke3 Bg2 42.Kxd3 White misses a chance with Kf2! If the Bishop takes on h3, he is essentially trading the White h3 pawn for the Black passer as the Bishop has no way out. He could choose repetition and a draw, but that would give White the tournament.
42...Bxh3 43.Ne4 Bxg4 44.f6 Bh5 45.Nxg5 Bg6+ 46.Ke3 Kxf6 47.Nf3 Bb1 At this point, both players were low on time and couldn't take notation. Bill asked if I would notate for them and the remainder of the score is my notes, corrected by Bill after the game. Any drop in the quality of the game is due to the Blitz conditions.
48.a3 Kf5 49.Nh2 h5 50.Kf3 Ba2 51.b4 h4 52.Nf1 Bd5+ 53.Kf2 Kf4 54.Ne3 Bc6 55.Nf1 Ke4 56.Nh2 Kd4 57.Ke2 Kc3 58.Ke3 Kb3 59.Kd3 Bb5+ 60.Kd2 Kxa3 61.Kc3 Be2 62.Kd2 Bh5 63.Kc3 b5 64.Nf1 Be2 65.Nh2 a6 66.Kd2 Kxb4 67.Kxe2 Kc3 68.Nf3 h3 69.Kf2 b4 70.Kg3 b3 71.Ng5 b2 72.Ne4+ Kd3 73.Nc5+ Kc2 74.Kxh3 b1=Q 75.Nxa6 Qf1+ 76.Kg3 Qxa6


0-1

Suarez, Ron (1705) - Crum, Randy (1500)
Peoria City Championship, 06/29/2009

Round 4


1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 d6 3.g3 Nf6 4.Bg2 a6 5.d3 e6 Usually Black will also fianchetto in the Closed Sicilian. Here Black elects a setup from the Scheveningen.
6.Be3 Qc7 7.h3 Bd7 8.Qd2 Bc6 Black takes 2 moves to reach this post, falling behind in development.
9.Nge2 d5 Black decides to open the center, moving from the opening into the middle game. Time to stop and review. Both Kings are still in the center, but White is ready to castle on either wing. Black has 2 minor pieces, and hence their corner Rooks are still on their original squares, waiting to join the game. So the Black King is trapped in the center, he is behind in development and then chooses to open the game based on the possibility of getting in d5-d4 forking 2 pieces. Even if the fork was successful, this would be a bad plan as there will be plenty of opportunities for White to conjure combinations.
10.exd5 exd5 11.Bf4 Bd6 12.Qe3+ The problem with Kings in the center!
12...Kd7 13.Bxd6 Qxd6 14.Qg5 Rg8 15.O-O-O And White is safe while Black must be very careful
15...h6 If h6 is correct, it should have been played last move.
16.Qf5+ Kc7 Qe6 17.Nf4 The pressure on d5 is crushing. Not only does White have it well covered, the Black Knight on f6 is pinned against the f7 square.
17...d4 18.Ncd5+ Kd8 19.Nxf6 Qxf6 20.Qxc5 Bxg2 21.Nxg2 The exchanges should now be done, White has won a pawn and has good position. He should win. But, having achieved his goals, White has to reorganize now. Black should develop his Knight and Rooks and try to hold a draw.
21...Qxf2 The final mistake. The Queen is too exposed on f2 and his f7 is too weak and his undeveloped pieces can't help.
22.Qd5+ Kc7 Again Nd7 was better. Best line for Black is Nd7 23.Rdf1 Qxb3 24.Rxf7 Qg5+ trading Queens and entering a lost endgame 2 pawns down - the d4 & g5 pawns can't be held. But at least White would still have work to do.
23.Rhf1 Qxg3 24.Rxf7+ Black resigns


1-0

Voss, Andrew (1794) - Khan, Saleem (1601)
Peoria City Championship, 06/22/2009

Round 4


1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nd4 White is played against the Sicilian as if it were a Ruy Lopez, so Black tries the Bird's Defense. Like the in the Bird, the fate of Black's d4 pawn should turn the game.
4.Nxd4 cxd4 5.O-O a6 6.Bc4 e5 7.f4 Qc7 8.d3 Nf6 9.fxe5 Qxe5 10.Rf5 Getting the Rook involved too soon. better would have been either Bf4 or Nd2-f3!
10...Qc7 11.Rf1 Bd6 A good move if only Black could give his d7 pawn away so his QB could play too.
12.Bg5 Bxh2+ 13.Kh1 Be5 14.Nd2 O-O 15.Nf3 Nh5 16.Nxe5 Ng3+ 17.Kg1 Qxe5 Black has played well to here - he's actually winning with Nxf1! But this mistake is a biggie as his Queen is vulnerable and he never gets the chance to take the Rook.
18.Bf4 Qh5 19.Bxg3 Qg5 20.Bf4 Bd6 Qg6 21.Qf3 d6 22.Qg3 Qh5 23.Bxd6 Rd8 24.Bxf7+ Qxf7 25.Rxf7 Kxf7 26.Rf1+ Kg8 27.Qf4 I apparently missed mate in 9 or 10.


1-0

Zimmerle, Wayne (1715) - Crum, Randy (1500)
Peoria City Championship, 06/22/2009

Round 9


1.d4 d5 2.Nc3 Bf5 3.Nf3 e6 4.a3 Nf6 5.Bg5 h6 6.Bh4 Be7 7.e3 Nbd7 8.Bd3 Bxd3 9.Qxd3 O-O I never understand Wayne's Openings. He doesn't like to play main lines, so he always leaves his opponent to think for himself. But he does most things right, values development and often gets a strong attack with original play. Can't be all bad. But sometimes his moves don't push the first move initiative hard enough and this time Black has a good game
10.O-O-O c5 11.Nb1 Rhe8 a6 Rc8 or Ne4 are stronger
12.h3 Doesn't anybody want to win this game? :-)
12...Ne4 13.Bg3 Rc8 Finally Black plays his pieces to the proper squares and gets an advantage
14.Nfd2 c4 If I were Black I'd play the QN to f6 to keep a Knight on e4 and then open the game with c5xd4. However the bind Black can get here is also good.
15.Qe2 Ndf6 16.Nxe4 Nxe4 17.c3 Qb6 b5 18.Qc2 Qa5 19.Bh2 Bh4 20.g3 Be7 21.f3 Ng5 f3 is the vulnerable pawn, Black cannot afford to take on h3 without the risk of getting his Knight trapped with f4. Rhf1 or Qe2 is good enough.
22.Qg2 Rc6 23.h4 Nh7 24.g4 g5 No! Black's game is good enough - this move gives White an attack and the advantage.
25.hxg5 Bxg5 26.f4 Be7 27.Qh3 g5 f5 28.gxf5 exf5 29.Rdg1+ Kh8 30.Rg2 Qd8 31.Rhg1 Bf6 Nd2-f3-e5 32.Qg3 Qe8 33.Nd2 Rc8 34.Nf3 The only reason White isn't just smashing Black is his ugly Dark squared Bishop. He should play either Qf3 or Qh3.
34...Rg8 35.Qf2 Qe7 36.Ne5 Rxg2 BxN 37.Rxg2 Qxg2 wins
37...Nf8 38.Qg3 Qg7 39.Qh3 Qh7 40.Qh5 Rc7 41.Ng6+ Qe8! White shouldn't exchange his powerful Knight for a defensive one. Let Black exchange it - and he should exchange his Bishop for it, for then White get the f4 post for his out of play Bishop.
41...Nxg6 42.Rxg6 Bg7 43.Qxf5 Ooops - Rd6 is still winning
43...Rc6 Turning the tables, now it's White turn to be a punching bag
44.Qxd5 Qxg6 45.f5 Qg5 46.Bf4 Qg1+ 47.Kc2 Qf2+ 48.Kb1 h5 Better is Kh7 with the idea of Rb6 - every move should include a drop of poison
49.Qf7 Qg1+ 50.Ka2 Rb6 51.Qxh5+ Kg8 52.Qe8+ Kh7 53.Qh5+ The game is drawn. White could chance Qe2 protecting the King and threatening the c4 pawn and hoping to win with an avalanche of pawns - but it's a long shot.


1/2-1/2

Suarez, Ron (1705) - Leali, Dominick (1605)
Peoria City Championship, 06/22/2009

Round 9


1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 d6 3.g3 e6 4.Bg2 Nf6 5.d3 Nc6 6.Be3 d5 7.exd5 exd5 8.Bg5 d4 9.Qe2+ Qe7 10.Qxe7+ Bxe7 11.Bxf6 Bxf6 12.Nd5 O-O Bd8 13.Nxf6+ gxf6 14.O-O-O Re8 15.Nf3 Bg4 16.Rde1 Rab8 17.Nd2 Nb4 18.Ne4 White's pawn structure and powerful fianchettoed Bishop give him an edge
18...Kg7 19.a3 Na6 20.h3 Bd7 21.Nd6 Re5 Re4 22.f4 Rxe1+ Re4 is still the move
23.Rxe1 b6 Ooops - Re7 is a killer so it's better to give up the pawn
24.Re7 Be6 25.f5


1-0

Leali, Mike (1908) - Voss, Andy (1794)
Peoria City Championship, 06/15/2009

Round 3


1.e4 e6 I don't think that I have ever played the French in a long tournament game, but I could be wrong. I was just a guess that Mike hadn't been studying it. - AV
2.d4 d5 3.e5 c5 4.c3 Nc6 5.Nf3 Qb6 6.Bd3 cxd4 7.cxd4 Bd7 Black can't take on d4 or he loses a piece as Bb5+ is a nasty surprise at the end of the combination-MR
8.Be2 Nh6 8...Nge7 is more accurate with the same idea.
9.Nc3 9.Bxh6! 9...Nf5 10.Na4 Qa5+ 11.Bd2 Bb4 12.Nc3 Nfxd4 13.Nxd4 Nxd4 14.a3 Be7 15.Bd3 Rc8 16.O-O Ne2 Qc7 17.Qg4 Qxe5 18.Rae1 Qf6 19.f4 Nb3 20.Be3 d4 20...Nc5 This maintains the advantage, but I got stuck on the f5 variation.
21.Ne4 Qh6 22.Qd1 I did not envision 22. Qd1, I was focused on playing f5 to win the knight. 22.Bc1 f5 23.Qf3 fxe4 24.Bxe4 Rxc1 25.Rxc1 Nxc1 26.Rxc1-+ -AV
Black's game is still quite playable - probably even better - he has the extra pawn and the Bishop pair-MR
22...dxe3 23.Qxb3 Bc6 24.Rxe3 Qh5 25.Rg3 Bxe4 0-0 26.Bxe4 Qc5+ 27.Kh1 Qc4 28.Qxc4 Rxc4 29.Bxb7 Bf6 Why not just castle and have all your pieces in play ?
30.b3 Rc7 31.Ba6 Ke7 32.Bc4 g6 33.Rgf3 h5 Losing the thread - Rd8 - it's the endgame so Black needs active Rooks
34.g3 Rd3 Rd8 35.R3f2 a5 36.a4 36.Rc2 Rd4 37.Rfc1 is more accurate.-AV
a4 is bad because it stops White's own advance on the Q-side. Blacks 1 pawn can now hold White's 2. The idea should be to eventually make a passer here
36...Rd4 36...h4!? 37.g4 Rcd7 38.Kg2 Rd2 39.Rxd2 Rxd2+ 40.Rf2 Rxf2+ 41.Kxf2 Bd4+ 42.Kf3 f5 43.h3 e5 44.fxe5 Bxe5=
37.Rc2 g5 38.fxg5 Bxg5 39.Rcf2 f5 Not good - makes the K-pawn backwards and susceptible to White's doubling of Rooks
40.Re2 Rdxc4 40...Re4!= -AV
Yes Re4 is ugly but must be played - then the game is still on -MR
41.bxc4 Kf6 42.Rc2 Rc5 There must be more to the game - perhaps time pressure forced the players off notation. White has a real advantage but there are still more moves to be played to prove it. -MR


1-0

Wayne Zimmerle (1715) - Mike Leali (1908)
Peoria City Championship, 06/08/2009

Round 7


1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 c5 3.Nc3 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nxc6 bxc6 6.e3 e5 7.Bc4 d5 8.Bb3 Bb4 9.Bd2 a passive opening by White gives Black an early initiative.
9...O-O Ba6 10.O-O Bg4 11.Ne2 Bc5 12.c3 d4 More usual would be Qb6 followed by Rooks to the Center before crashing the gate.
13.cxd4 exd4 14.Qe1 dxe3 15.Bxe3 Re8 Bxe3 16.fxe3 Re8 17.Nd4 c5 18.Nc2 Qd3 19.Qg3 Qg6 20.Rac1 Rad8 21.h3 Bf5 22.Qxg6 Bxg6 23.Na3 Ne4 24.Rcd1 wrong Rook
24...Nd2 25.Rf2 Nxb3 26.Rxd8 Rxd8 27.axb3 Rd3 Now we see why the other Rook was needed. Rc3 would be a big help here.
28.Nc4 Rxb3 29.Rd2 Kf8 30.Kf2 Ke7 31.Ne5 Be4 32.Nc4 In two moves White has not changed his position, has centralized Black's Bishop & given Black the move.
32...a6 33.Nd6 Adventurous. White should move the g&h pawns to Dark squares and let Black carry the fight.
33...Bg6 Bd3 would eventually trap the Knight.
34.g4 h6 Bd3 is still best here tho it no longer wins the piece. Of the other moves I like h5 best.
35.Nc8+ Ke6 36.Ke2 h5 37.Nd6 hxg4 38.hxg4 Bd3+ Great idea - why play Cat & Mouse when you can exchange to a won King ending!?!
39.Rxd3 Rxd3 40.Kxd3 Kxd6 41.Ke4 Ke6 42.b3 f6 43.Kd3 Black has all the tempo moves too!
43...Kd5 44.e4+ Ke5 45.g5 Something had to give way - Ke3 fails to a pawn move and penetration by the King.
45...fxg5 46.Ke3 g4


0-1

Drew Streitmatter (1541) - Dominick Leali (1605)
Peoria City Championship, 06/08/2009

Round 7


1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Qxd4 White centralizes his Queen - not a bad idea if he can avoid getting it chased around with the loss of tempo.
4...Nc6 5.Bb5 to protect the Queen.
5...Bd7 6.Bxc6 Bxc6 bxc6 would give Black a strong pawn center.
7.Nc3 Nf6 8.Bg5 e5 9.Qd3 Be7 10.O-O-O Nxe4 Oops - a mistake - doesn't work out well.
11.Nxe4 Bxe4 12.Bxe7 Bxd3 13.Bxd8 Rxd8 14.Rxd3 e4 15.Re3 d5 16.Nd4 O-O 17.h4 h5 18.Rg1 Rd6 19.g4 Rf6 20.gxh5 Rxf2 21.Reg3 Kh8 22.Rxg7 e3 23.h6 e2 24.Nxe2 Not necessary as Kd2 holds, but still winning
24...Rxe2 25.h7 Re1+ Best - the Rook on f8 is unprotected, only this check or a rook to e8 holds for a while. All else loses quickly.
26.Rxe1 Kxg7 27.Re7 Yes - Rooks belong on the 7th. An active Rook is worth at least 1 pawn in an end game.
27...Rh8 28.Rxb7 Rxh7 29.Rxa7 Rxh4 30.Re7 Kg6 Kf6 31.Kd2 f6 32.b3 Kf5 33.Re3 Kf4 34.a4 d4 35.Re6 f5 36.a5 Rh8 37.Kd3 Rc8 38.b4 Rc3+ 39.Kxd4 Rxc2 40.b5 Rb2 41.Kc5 Rc2+ 42.Kb6 The rest of the struggle is useless. White trades his rook for Black's last pawn and then pushes his own pawns. Black has only 1 Rook to sacrifice so White will Queen.
42...Rc8 43.Kb7 Rc5 44.Ka6 Kg4 45.b6 Rc1 46.b7 Rb1 47.Ka7 f4 48.b8=Q Rxb8 49.Kxb8 f3 50.Rf6 Kg3 51.a6 f2 52.Rxf2 Kxf2 53.a7 Ke3 54.a8=Q Kf4 55.Qd5 Kg3 56.Qe4 Kh2 57.Kc7 Kg3 58.Kd6 Kf2 59.Qd3 Kg2 60.Ke5 Kf2 61.Kf4 Kg2 62.Qe2+ Kh3 63.Qd2 Kh4 64.Qh2#


1-0

Bill Naff (2000) - Andrew Voss (1794)
Peoria City Championship, 06/08/2009

Round 7


1.f4 I have never seen Bill play anything but 1.e4 in the opening, so I thought I knew what he was going to play. Good thing I didn't have much time to prepare or I would have been extremely disappointed. AV
1...d6 2.Nf3 c6 3.e4 Nd7 4.Bc4 I'd prefer d4 & Bd3. MR
4...b5 This is begging to be played. AV
5.Be2 A loss of time, but White prefers Closed games & Black isn't ready to open it up - no harm no foul. MR
5...e5 6.O-O a4 or d4 would be the thematic responses. MR
6...Ngf6 7.d3 While it follows the plan of keeping the game closed, 7. d4 attempting to rip apart the center might have been a better plan. AV
White is selecting a standard setup for a King-side attack. the f-pawn pushes the Queen travels e1-g3 or h4, the Bishop may settle on g5 or h6, the Knight may exchange in the center or play to g5. MR
7...Qb6+ 8.Kh1 Ng4 9.Qe1 Ne3 10.Bxe3 Qxe3 Fritz agrees with this line of play. AV
11.f5 Be7 12.Qd2 I don't like this move for White - he should get more out of the opening. In Bill's defense, he plays minor pieces extremely well and probably had confidence in his minor pieces middlegame. Play the moves that work best for you. MR
12...Qb6 Why didn't I just take it castle and have a nice game. AV
13.a4 Nf6 14.a5 Qc7 15.b4 a6 16.Qc3 Ng4 Black should complete development first, I prefer Bb7. MR
17.Nfd2 h5 Ne3 looks like fun now - Rf3 d5, exd5 & Nxd5. MR
18.h3 Bf6 19.g3 Ne3 20.Rf3 d5 21.Nf1 d4 22.Qb2 Ng4 This just throws it away! AV
I'd still rather play Black. Let's look at the position - material is even, Black has more space & the pawn break throughs at c5 & g6, the White Bishop is bad and his Knights are on the back row. MR
23.Kg2 Nh6 24.Nbd2 Qe7 24...c5! I had considered this, but thought that i loosened up my king position too much... as though my King was perfectly safe. 25.bxc5 Qxc5 26.Rc1 h4 and my attack on the white King is still alive. AV
yes, the position begs for c5. MR
25.Nh2 Bg5 26.Nhf1 Bxd2 this is where Black went wrong. c5 still is strong, but trading the powerful black square Bishop for a cramped Knight throws away all the advantages that Black had built. c5 needs to be played BEFORE a Knight can get over there however. Giving up the Bishop does nothing to stop White from moving a Knight to c5. MR
27.Nxd2 Now the Knight reaches a strong post & his Q-Rook can come to the defense on the K-side. MR
27...Qg5 This is the culmination of a terrible plan. AV
28.Nb3 g6 29.f6 h4 30.Qc1 Bxh3+ 31.Kxh3 The sacrifice must be taken. MR
31...Qg4+ 32.Kg2 h3+ The final straw. There is no longer any attack. AV
Deeper analysis shows that Nf5 is the Killer move for Black - if exf5, hxg3 wins in all lines. MR
33.Kh2 Qh5 34.Rf2 Ng4+ 35.Bxg4 Qxg4 36.Qd1 Qg5 37.Nc5 Rh5 38.Qf3 Kd8 39.Ne6+ It's a killer! AV


1-0

Peter McConaghie (1808) - Ron Suarez (1705)
Peoria City Championship, 06/08/2009

Round 7


1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 c5 4.c3 Nc6 5.Nf3 Qb6 6.Be2 cxd4 7.cxd4 Nh6 When looking up this game in ECO, I was surprised to see that Nh6 was a main line.
8.Bxh6 Qxb2 9.Bxg7 Bxg7 of course, these exchanges were a footnote. The book preferred Nbd2 without the exchanges. The lost pawn on h6 isn't as important as White's freedom to poke at Black's Queen.
10.Nbd2 Nxd4 11.Qa4+ Nc6 12.Rb1 Qc3 13.O-O Too anxious. Bb5 gives Black more problems & protects the e-pawn.
13...O-O 14.Rb3 or Rfc1.
14...Qa5 15.Qf4 Qc7 Black settles into a defensive posture having won 2 pawns. He should weather White's attack.
16.Rc1 f6 17.Qh4 Qe7 18.exf6 Qxf6 19.Qg3 e5 20.Rb5 e4 21.Rxd5 exf3 22.Nxf3 The unbalance has been converted from pawns to a piece v pawn, but White now has a spatial advantage. Temporary advantages must used immediately before they whither or the more permanent material advantage will win out.
22...Qf4 23.Qxf4 Rxf4 Trading Queens usually helps the defense, but here Black is still undeveloped with his Q-Rook & Q-Bishop.
24.Rg5 Rf5 Be6 25.Bc4+ Kf8 26.Rg3 Rc5 27.Ng5 Be5 28.Rf3+ Kg7 29.Rf7+ Kh6 The King must stay on Black to keep away from White's c4 Bishop. A Bishop check will win Black's Rook on c5!
30.h4 Suddenly Black is in trouble - he should have developed sooner.
30...Bg7 31.Rc7 Bf5 32.Nf7+ Kg6 33.Nd6 Kf6 34.Rf7+ Ke5 Black is now busted - either Nxb7 or Nxf5 wins. Only one capture fails...
35.Rxg7 This only trades pieces and the permanent material balance remains.
35...Kxd6 36.Rd1+ Ke5 37.Bb3 Rd8 38.Re1+ Kd4 39.Rxb7 Rd6 40.Rc7 Rd1+ ... Ke5 loses to f4+ so Black must play Bd6 & the h7 pawn falls.
40...Rf6 41.f3 Re5 42.Rd1+ Ke3 43.Re1+ Kd4 44.Rd1+ Kc5 45.Rc1+ Time to push pawns ... g4 etc
45...Kb6 Sanctuary!
46.Rg7 Rd6 47.Bc4 Rc5 The Bishop or Rook is now lost
48.Rb7+ Kxb7 49.Ba6+ Kxa6 50.Rxc5 Be6 and Black won ... Ron tried to reconstruct as much as possible from memory but many moves were played after the 5 minute mark. Peter played many of those moves with 7 seconds on the clock. WZ


0-1

Andrew Voss (1794) - Wayne Zimmerle (1715)
Peoria City Championship, 06/01/2009

Round 6


1.e4 d5 2.exd5 Qxd5 3.Nc3 Qd8 4.Bc4 Nf6 5.Nf3 Bg4 6.Bxf7+ Black played the Opening too routinely & so falls into an old trap! MR
6...Kxf7 7.Ne5+ Ke8 8.Nxg4 Qd7 9.Nxf6+ exf6 10.O-O Nc6 11.Re1+ Be7 12.Ne4 Kf7 13.c3 Rhe8 14.Qb3+ Kf8 15.d4 Na5 16.Qd1 Nc4 17.Qh5 Kg8 Castled at last MR
18.b3 Nd6 19.Qd5+ Kh8 20.Nc5 Qc8 21.Bb2 c6 22.Qe6 Qc7 23.Qg4 Bf8 24.c4 Rxe1+ 25.Rxe1 Re8 Qa5 26.Rxe8 Nxe8 27.Qd7 Qe6 Qxd7 28.Nxd7 Bb4 Bd6 to control the Knight. The Knights only way out is in the doubling of his c-pawns. That should make it easier for Black to try to hold on.
29.a3 Bd2 30.g3 Nd6 Kg8 31.Nc5 b6 32.Ne6 a wonderful post for a Knight - it can't be driven out. If the King approaches, the c6-pawn falls
32...Kg8 33.Kf1 Nc8 34.Ke2 Bh6 Out of Play MR
35.Bc3 Ne7 36.Bb4 Nf5 37.g4 Nxd4+ 38.Nxd4 c5 39.Bxc5 I'll call it second best. Fritz likes...39.Bd2! Bxd2 40.Kxd2 cxd4 41.Kd3 with an easily won pawn ending. AV
or Nf5!
39...bxc5 40.Ne6 Bc1 41.a4 Ba3 42.Nd8 Kf8 43.Nc6 a6 44.Nb8 Losing my advantage. 44. a5! AV
White is still winning - the Q-side will produce a passer. MR
44...Ke8 45.Nxa6 Kd7 46.Kd3 46.b4! AV
46...Kc6 47.Kc3 Kb7 The Knight must die - but three connected passers are very strong MR
48.Nxc5+ Bxc5 49.f3 Bd6 50.h3 Be5+ 51.Kb4 Bd4 52.Kb5 g6 53.c5 f5 54.b4 fxg4 55.fxg4 h5 56.Kc4 Be3 57.b5 hxg4 58.hxg4 g5 59.a5 Bd2 60.a6+ Ka7 61.Kd5 Bf4 62.Kc6 Bg3 63.Kd7 Bf4 64.c6 Kb6 65.c7 Bxc7 66.a7 Kb7 67.a8=Q+


1-0

Ron Suarez (1705) - Bill Naff (2000)
Peoria City Championship, 06/01/2009

Round 6


1.e4 c5 2.Nc3 g6 3.g3 Bg7 4.Bg2 Nc6 5.d3 e6 6.Be3 Nd4 a more aggressive way to defend the c5 pawn
7.Qd2 Ne7 8.Nd1 the more traditional approach would be o-o-o with f5 or h5 and the usual Yugoslav attack. Bill plays good defense and may have been wanting to play those well known lines. Personally I don't like Knights on the back rank unless the game is hopelessly closed- but then playing Bill as Ron has many times - maybe he knows Bill's predilection for closed positions.
8...e5 9.c3 Ne6 10.Nf3 Nc6 11.Bh6 O-O 12.h4 f6 13.Bxg7 Kxg7 OK - now we're playing real chess.
14.Ne3 a poke with h5 might have been fun opening up the h-file for the Rook. If Black answers with g5, then Ne3 with a choice of playing Nf5!
14...Ne7 15.O-O-O h5 16.d4 Qa5 17.Kb1 Why not d5 & d6, Qxa2 gets only a pawn and drops a full piece - there's no lasting attack as the Q has no support. So there's time to play Kb1 after locking up the Black center.
17...cxd4 18.cxd4 Qxd2 19.Rxd2 exd4 20.Nxd4 Nxd4 21.Rxd4 b5 22.Rd6 a6 23.e5 Playing a tactic just because he can ... I'd prefer Rhd1 with a build up before exploding the center. Black is going nowhere - he's in near zugszwang.
23...Ra7 24.exf6+ Rxf6 25.Rxf6 Kxf6 All these exchanges have reduced White's game to even. Black an breathe a sigh of relief - he's back in the game.
26.Rd1 Rc7 27.Rc1 Rxc1+ 28.Kxc1 Trading further. Now White is facing a former Master in an even minor piece endgame - dangerous waters for any player below Expert.
28...Ke5 29.Kd2 d5 Pushing Black's advantage - the passed d-pawn. Note it also makes room for the previously locked up Bishop.
30.Kd3 Be6 31.a3 a5 32.f4+ Probably a mistake. Pawns can't move backwards so each move must be thought out carefully. This move, although it moves the Black King off the center, gives Black command of the White K-side squares. To win a player needs to press his advantages against his opponents weaknesses. White pawn advantage was on the K-side and now he won't be able to force a passer without heavy piece involvement. Black, in the mean time can return his King to the center by another route.
32...Kd6 33.Bf3 Kc5 34.Be2 d4 35.b4+ axb4 36.axb4+ Kxb4 37.Kxd4 Nf5+ 38.Nxf5 Bxf5 This exchange should favor Black. Again, the K-side White squares favor the defender while Black can continue to work his passer on the Q-side. Note that Bishops of the same color favors the attacker - in this case Black.
39.Bd1 The losing move since Blacks King gets to a3 and White's Bishop must now sacrifice himself on b3. If White had played Bf1, staying on the diagonal, White's King would have had to move to a4 and so Black would reach the b3 blocking square, safe from Black's W-square Bishop.
39...Ka3 40.Kc3 b4+ 41.Kc4 b3 42.Bxb3 Be6+ 43.Kd4 Kxb3 44.Ke5 Bf5 The game is now over, there are no more tricks for White to try.
45.Kf6 Kc4 46.Kg5 Kd5 47.g4 hxg4 48.h5 gxh5 49.Kxf5 g3


0-1

Dominick Leali (1605) - Saleem Khan (1601)
Peoria City Championship, 06/01/2009

Round 6


1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 e6 4.Nc3 d5 Nf6 5.Bg5 Be7 6.Bd3 As there are no useful discoveries with this Bishop, this move essentially loses a pawn.
6...cxd4 7.Nb5 e5 8.Bxf6 gxf6 Black can't permit Nd6+.
9.Nh4 A good idea as Black's pieces are awkward for the moment. White's only friend is his better development - and temporary leads must be pushed quickly. Unfortunately his own Knight on b5 is also quite awkward.
9...a6 10.Na3 Bxa3 The Q check is better as it pushes the W-King to the f1 square burying the KR. BxNa3 is still an option.
11.bxa3 Qa5+ 12.Qd2 Qxa3 13.O-O d6 14.Qh6 Ke7 15.f4 Qc5 Be6! 16.fxe5 White has Ng6+! hxg6 gives up a Rook and on fxg6, White has Qg7!
16...Qxe5 17.Nf5+ Ng6+ is still playable.
17...Kd8 Bxf5 18.Qg7 Re8 19.Nh6 Correct - not a time to stop and pick daises like the one on h7
19...Be6 20.Rab1 Rf5 wins the Queen as BxR is impossible due to Nxf7 forking the royal couple.
20...Kc7 21.Rxf6 Bxa2 Black already has his pawn, better to play defense with Re7
22.Rbf1 Kb6 23.R1f5 Qe7 24.Rxf7 Excellent sacrifice - White needs to break through now.
24...Bxf7 25.Rxf7 Qd8 26.Rxb7+ Ka5 27.Qf7 d5 28.Qf1 with the threat of Qa1 mate. Both score sheets kind of break down and I'm not even sure this is the actual position at this point. White went on to win by Queening his extra pawn in the ending. - WZ - I don't know how Black would last that long unless White missed the mate!


1-0

Drew Streitmatter (1541) - Peter McConaghie (1808)
Peoria City Championship, 06/01/2009

Round 6


1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.exd5 exd5 The exchange variation offers no opening advantage. N-c3 or d2 or e5 are all better tries for White.
4.Bd3 Nf6 5.Nc3 Bb4 6.Bg5 h6 7.Bh4 O-O 8.Nge2 c6 9.h3 Qd6 10.Bg3 Bxc3+ 11.bxc3 Qe7 12.O-O Nbd7 Be6 first, this blocks the QB.
13.Re1 Qa3 14.Qd2 Nh5 15.Bc7 I like Bh4 better with possible tactics building around Be7
15...b6 16.Reb1 Re8 17.Nf4 Nhf6 18.Re1 I don't see whats wrong with trading Rooks and then taking on a2, but I wouldn't do it either.
18...Bb7 19.Bf5 Rxe1+ 20.Rxe1 Qa5 Is this really a better square for the Q - seems a3 is better as it allows the return along the dark squares. If the Q is to be out of play, just take the a2 pawn.
21.Re7 The result of moving the Q off the dark diagonal
21...Bc8 Black should swallow his pride and return the Q to a3
22.Qe3 Nf8 23.Bxc8 Rxc8 24.f3 Qxa2 25.Qe5 N6d7 The only losing move. Easiest is just Qxc2 saving the check in case it's needed. White's attacks can all be answered unless he is given the opportunity to get at f7.
26.Qf5 White is threatening Qxf7+ followed by Qxg7 mate so it doesn't matter that the bishop is hanging. - WZ
26...Nf6 27.Qxc8 Qa3 28.Re3 Qc1+ 29.Kf2 Qxc2+ 30.Ne2 c5 31.Bd6 N6d7 32.Bxf8 Nxf8 33.Re8 cxd4 34.Rxf8+ Kh7 35.Rxf7 dxc3 36.Qf5+ Qxf5 37.Rxf5 c2 38.Rxd5


1-0

Wayne Zimmerle (1715) - Ron Suarez (1705)
Peoria City Championship, 05/23/2009

Round 5


1.d4 Nf6 2.Nc3 g6 3.Bg5 Bg7 4.Qd2 h5 I'm unfamiliar with whats going on, but White's play is more natural and easier to understand.
5.e4 d6 6.O-O-O c6 7.Bd3 Qa5 8.Nge2 Na6 9.a3 early pawn moves should be played with care as they give the opponent targets
9...b5 10.e5 Answering an attack on the wing with one in the center
10...dxe5 11.dxe5 Ng4 12.Nd4 Bb7 b4 13.f4 Rd8 14.Nb3 Ne6 at least wins material - fxe6 is followed up by Bxg6+ and QxRd8! & mate
14...Qb6 15.Ne4 Ne3 16.Rde1 Nd5 17.Bh4 Nf6 b4 18.Bf2 Qc7 19.a4 Nxf4 20.Nd6+ Kf8 21.Qxf4 Ooops!! 21...Bh6 22.Re4 Bxf4+ 23.Rxf4 exd6 24.Bxg6 Rd7 Trying too hard. Trade the Q for the R&B and Black is a Rook ahead. Song for the game - "Hang on Loosely, But Never Let Go"
25.e6 Re7 26.Bxf7 d5 27.Bg3 Somebody is going to get electrocuted with all these batteries
27...Qxf4+ 28.Bxf4 Rxf7 29.exf7 Kxf7 OK - time to count up the carnage. Material is back to even. We have Bishops of the opposite colors. Black has too many pawns on the same color as his Bishop, White can block them in place using his Knight. Black's King is more vulnerable in the Center. White has the K-side pawn advantage, Black has the Q-side pawn advantage.
30.Rf1 Kg6 31.Nd4 Nc5 Not good, makes his Bishop bad in the long term. He'd like to play c5 but that loses to tactics. Time to activate the Rook with Re8 or Rf8 & then look at c5 later
32.b3 Ne4 33.g3 Rc8 34.Nf3 Ba6 35.Ne5+ Kg7 36.Rf3 Nc3 c5 is the move. The Knight leaves a magnificent center outpost that can defend or attack for one closer to the King. If his Bishop & Rook could support the attack, it might be a geat move. But he leaves the King to fend alone against Whites 3 pieces while his other 2 pieces are blocked out of both attacking and defensive moves.
37.Bg5 Rc7 38.Rf6 Attacking both the c and h pawns
38...Ne4 Forced to return to the defense
39.Rg6+ Kh7 40.Rh6+ Kg7 41.Rxh5 Nxg5 42.Rxg5+ Kf6 43.Rh5 Be2 44.g4 c5 45.Kd2 Bf1 The connected g & h passers will eventually win out, but there is still play in the game, but it's all in White's favor


1-0

Mike Leali (1908) - Drew Streitmatter (1541)
Peoria City Championship, 05/18/2009

Round 5


1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 g6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nc6 5.Nc3 Bg7 6.Be3 Nf6 7.f3 O-O 8.Qd2 Re8 9.Bc4 a5 Pretty much standard opening lines for both sides until now. This pawn belongs on a6 to support b5 and the Q-side counter attack which Black must develop between his K-side defending moves.
10.h4 Ne5 11.Bb3 I think Be2 is best here allowing White to push g4 without worrying about the f3 pawn base.
11...e6 Wrong pawn. d6 is the move. e6 Makes Blacks W-square Bishop worse and gives White a ready target with the now backward pawn on the open d-file.
12.O-O-O d5 The only move after playing e6
13.exd5 Bh6 exd5 14.a3 Nc4 15.Bxc4 dxc4 16.Bg5 Ra6 17.h5 Rd6 18.hxg6 fxg6 19.Qf4 Qb6 Nh5 20.Ncb5 Nd5 Ooops! Rook to either d7 or d8 holds and the game is still on.
21.Qxd6


1-0

Randy Crum (1500) - Andy Voss (1794)
Peoria City Championship, 05/18/2009

Round 5


1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.Bf4 Bg7 5.e3 c6 6.Nf3 O-O 7.Bd3 Nbd7 8.cxd5 cxd5 9.O-O Nb6 10.Nb5 Randy has played the opening nicely as he usually does, here opening the c-file and then zeroing in on the c7 square.
10...Nh5 Unexpected. Logically, with the problems surrounding c7, the W-square Bishop needs to move to open c8 for the Rook. Where to go? g4 or d7? d7 attacks the b5-Knight making counterplay possible.
11.Bc7 Qd7 12.Ne5 Bxb6 & Qb3 gives White something to work on
12...Qe6 13.Rc1 f6 No love for this move that should lose material to Nxg6! If Bxg6, Black has fxe5 to stay in the game.
14.Nf3 Bd7 Black is finally getting untracked
15.Qb3 Kh8 16.Bxb6 Nxa7 Qxb6 17.Nc7 Qxb3 18.axb3 e5 The a-Rook should move to b,c or d. I like d8 best.
19.Nxd5 Bc6 20.e4 Nc7 Bxd5 21.exd5 Nf4 22.Rfd1 Ooops - Bc4 keeps the upper hand
22...e4 Nxd3 is even better
23.Bxe4 Ne2+ 24.Kf1 Nxc1 25.Rxc1 f5 26.Bd3 Rac8 27.Rc3 of course not Bc4 when Black has b5
27...a6 28.Ne5 A wonderful Knight post - Black cannot take as the pawn recapture gives White connected passers in the center
28...Bh6 29.Nf7+ Kg7 30.Nxh6 Kxh6 Giving up the wonderful central Knight for the Bishop doesn't help
31.Rc5 Kg5 32.g3 Kf6 33.Bc4 Ke7 34.Ke1 Kd6 35.Ra5 Rfe8+ 36.Kd2 Re4 37.Kd3 Rce8 38.Kd2 White should try b4 & b5 and break up the Q-side Black pawns. When behind seek active play!
38...Re1 Hmmm - Rxd4+ seems much easier
39.h4 f4 b4 & b5 still give Black the option of going wrong


0-1

Peter McConaghie (1808) - Dominick Leali (1605)
Peoria City Championship, 05/18/2009

Round 5


1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.Bc4 Nf6 4.e5 dxe5 5.Nxe5 e6 Peter's openings remind me of Tina Turner Rolling on the River - he doesn't do anything nice and easy - he does it nice and rough!
6.O-O Bd6 7.Nf3 O-O 8.d4 Nc6 9.dxc5 Bxc5 10.Nc3 Ng4 11.Qe2 Nxf2 12.Rxf2 Bxf2+ 13.Qxf2 Time to evaluate. The R+P v K+B trade is materially neutral. But White is more developed so he has a temporary lead in the position. The opening and middle games for this kind of trade usually favor the minor pieces - at least until the Rooks are in play & can make the extra pawn felt. Advantage White - but both players need to finish development ASAP. In addition, White needs to develop an attack with his piece majority.
13...b6 14.Bg5 f6 15.Be3 Qe7 16.Re1 Bb7 17.Qh4 White fails to punish Blacks careless development. Bxb6! would have left Black in deep trouble. There is no time to take back as the e-pawn along with both the King & Queen are threatened!
17...Nb4 18.Nd4 Nd5 19.Bd2 Bf2 is better as it keeps the diagonal covered
19...Qc5 20.Bd3 e5 Black needs to block the lethal diagonal
21.Qxh7+ Kf7 22.Bg6+ Ke7 23.Qxg7+ Kd8 24.Qxf8+ Qxf8 25.Ne6+ Ke7 26.Nxf8 Rxf8 27.Be4 Rd8 28.Nxd5+ Bxd5 29.Bxd5 Rxd5 30.Bc3 At this point the game is essentially over - the exchanges have cleared up all questions. White has pawn advantages on both sides, including the KR passer, he is a piece up and his King and pieces are squarely in front of Black's only advantage, the center passer.
30...Ke6 31.Kf2 Kf5 32.Kf3 Rd8 33.g3 Re8 34.Rd1 Rh8 35.h4 e4+ 36.Ke3 Kg4 37.Bxf6 Kxg3 38.Bxh8 Enough suffering - Black resigns


1-0

Saleem Khan (1601) - Mike Leali (1908)
Peoria City Championship, 04/20/2009

Round 5


1.e4 c5 2.c4 Saleem often plays for an early bind vs the Sicilian. Here Black continues his development, choosing not to try and capitalize on big hole on d4
2...d6 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 Nc6 5.Be2 e6 6.d3 Be7 7.O-O O-O 8.a3 Qc7 9.Bf4 a6 10.h3 Qb8 Unexpected. More usual would be prepping for either the b or d pawn push with the fianchetto of the Q-Bishop and Rooks behind the pawns. Of course he also has to do something with the f5 Bishop before playing d5.
11.Na4 b5 12.cxb5 Qxb5 Again unexpected. More usual would be axb with pawn play
13.d4 Qa5 14.Bd2 Qd8 For all the pushing around of Black's Queen, his game is still very good as White must now resolve the problem of his two hanging pawns.
15.e5 dxe5 16.dxe5 Nd5 If there is an advantage here it must belong to White as Black has an isolated pawn on the open c-file where White can attack it fairly easily.
17.Qc2 Rc1 Nd4 18.Nxd4 cxd4 19.Bf3 Bb7 20.Be4 h6 21.Qd3 Bc6 22.Qxd4 Rb8 23.Bc2 Bxa4 24.Bxa4 Nb6 A Good tactic - but it might have been even better if played before the trade of pieces on a4, forcing a position dominated by Black's Rooks
25.Bc3 Ooops - the Queen trade was forced - now Black wins a piece
25...Qxd4 26.Bxd4 Nxa4 27.Rab1 Rfd8 28.Rfd1 Bxa3 Nxb2 29.b3 Nc5 30.Ra1 Bb4 31.Rab1 a5 32.f4 Ne4 33.Bb2 Nd2 34.Rbc1 Nxb3 35.Rxd8+ Rxd8 36.Rf1 a4 37.f5 a3 38.Ba1 Nxa1 39.Rxa1 exf5 40.Kf2 Rd2+ 41.Ke3 Rxg2 42.Kd3 a2 43.Kc4 Ba5 44.Kb3 f4 45.h4 f3 Black goes on to win. - WZ


0-1

Peter McConaghie (1808) - Bill Naff (2000)
Peoria City Championship

Round 4


1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 g6 5.c3 Bg7 Bill often plays the Accelerated Dragon
6.Be3 Nf6 7.f3 O-O 8.Be2 d5 9.Nxc6 bxc6 10.Qa4 Qc7 11.Nd2 Nd7 Time to stop and look at the results of the opening. White has good development of his pieces but is not yet castled. Black seems to be undeveloping but is really moving his Knight from the K-side to the Q-side. As we know in the Sicilian, White attacks on the K-side, Black attacks on the Q-side. White's Q is out of place on the Q-side and so he has no immediate prospects of a K-side attack. This gives Black time to focus his forces on the Q-side.
12.O-O e6 13.Nb3 c5 14.Rad1 Nb6 15.Qa5 c4 16.Nc5 Re8 17.Bf2 Be5 18.h3 Bd6 19.Rd2 Bf4 20.Rdd1 Rb8 21.b3 After some jockeying for position the game continues
21...cxb3 22.axb3 Re7 23.Ba6 Bd6 24.b4 Nc4 25.Qxc7 Bxc7 26.Bxc8 Rxc8 Bxc4 27.Rfe1 dxe4 Be5 28.Rxe4 Nd6 29.Re2 Nb5 30.Rc2 White looked to be winning a pawn just a few moments ago, is now contracting to a defensive position
30...Be5 31.c4 Na3 32.Rcc1 Bb2 Black appears to win material, but the awkward position of his Knight on a3 keeps the position fluid
33.Bd4 Bxc1 34.Rxc1 a5 Giving back a pawn to try and save the Knight - the threat was Bb2
35.bxa5 Rec7 36.Rc3 Nb1 37.Rb3 Rc1 would have drawn by perpetual as the Knight can run, but he can't hide. Now Black can wiggle out.
37...Nd2 38.Rb5 Nxc4 39.a6 Nd6 40.Ra5 Nf5 41.Bf2 Ra8 42.Na4 Rc1+ 43.Kh2 Ra1 44.a7 While it looks like White is winning with his pawn on the verge of Queening, Black is on the move and not dead yet.
44...Ra2 45.Bc5 Nb6 fails to Rxa7 - not Rxa5
45...Kg7 46.Bb6 Rc2 47.Bc5 Where to put the Bishop?
47...Nh4 48.Kg3 White has to be careful - trying to win the Rook in the corner & Queen the pawn could end disastrously - {48.Nb6? Rxg2+ 49.Kh1 Rd8!
48...Nf5+ 49.Kf4 But running to the center doesn't help as there is a mating net out there
49...Rc4+ 50.Ke5 f6+ Ooops - Black spent a long think trying to figure out the mating net and lost himself in thought and now blunders in time trouble. Watching the clock is part of the game. Re8 was necessary - and it also threatens mate. Black would then have to sacrifice his Bishop on f8 to get breathing room or face mate on the move. The a7 pawn then Queens but is taken by the Rook leaving each side with a Knight and Rook. Black then wins as his Rook can start raiding the White K-side pawns while Whites pieces are far away from home. Note that there is still another mating net if White tries to save his pawns with g4 after Black plays Rc2!
51.Kxe6 Black runs out of time - WZ


1-0

Drew Streitmatter (1541) - Wayne Zimmerle (1715)
Peoria City Championship, 05/11/2009

Round 4


1.e4 d5 2.e5 c5 3.f4 Nc6 4.Bb5 Qb6 5.Bxc6+ Qxc6 6.d4 Bf5 7.Nc3 e6 8.Nf3 Be7 9.a4 An unusual line of the Center Counter, but understandable. Here White goes fishing before finishing development. He should activate his QB and Castle
9...Nh6 10.h3 f6 Black is playing for control of the Dark squares. If exf6, Bxf6 gives him command of the center.
11.Nh4 Another Knight on the Rim! On g4 Be4, exf Black can't play Bxf6 due to g5!
11...Be4 12.Nxe4 dxe4 13.g4 Time to take the census. Material is even but White's position is very loose. The Knight on the Rim is very grim & Black could also wind up with matching center pawns. The Rook is also loose. Too many loose pieces usually indicate that an combination is at hand.
13...cxd4 Either pawn capture or even the more strategical 0-0-0 should win. fxe5 is quickest. On g5 Black continues with exd4 with a crushing center. The pawn can't take the Knight as his own Knight falls with Check.
14.Qxd4 fxe5 15.Qxe5 Bxh4+ 16.Kf1 O-O 17.Rh2 Rad8 18.Re2 Only Be3 is playable.
18...Rd1+ Now a mate follows quickly with e3 & the White right behind.


0-1

Dominick Leali (1605) - Mike Leali (1908)
Peoria City Championship, 05/11/2009

Round 4


1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 a6 5.Bc4 Qc7 6.Qd3 Unusual. The Queen is exposed & can get overloaded
6...Nf6 7.Nc3 e6 8.O-O Be7 9.f4 Nc6 10.Nxc6 bxc6 11.h3 A wasted move. White should decide whether he wants his Q on the K or Q side. Play Qg3 for K-side, Be3 for Q-side and then finish developing by getting his Rooks to the best files.
11...O-O 12.g4 So this is why he played h3 - an all out assault! But it leaves the King very loose and exposed.
12...d5 The proper answer to an attack on the wing is a counter in the center!
13.Bb3 Bc5+ a4 14.Be3 Qb6 15.Bxc5 Qxc5+ 16.Kh2 a5 17.Rad1 Ooops Ba6 18.Qf3 Bxf1 19.Rxf1 dxe4 20.Na4 Qxc2+ Desperado!
21.Bxc2 exf3 22.Rxf3 With a pawn & exchange in hand the game belongs to Black
22...Rfd8 23.Kh1 Rf2 Rd2 Always place your Rooks on the 7th - or 2nd
24.Rc3 Nd5 25.Rxc6 Nb4 26.Rc4 Nxc2 27.Nc3 Ne3 28.Re4 Nd5 29.Na4 Rc8 30.Re1 f5 31.Rf1 fxg4 32.hxg4 Nxf4 33.Kg1 Rf8 34.Kh1 h5 35.Rg1 Nh3 36.gxh5 Rff2 37.h6 Rh2#


0-1

Wayne Zimmerle (1715) - Peter McConaghie (1808)
Peoria City Championship, 05/04/2009

Round 3


1.d4 d5 2.Nc3 Officially listed as Unusual Lines in ECO, White forgoes trying to get an advantage out of the opening selecting instead safe developing moves.
2...Bf5 3.Nf3 c6 4.Bg5 An unusual move in an unusual line. It remains to be seen if the Bishop can find value out here.
4...Nd7 5.e3 Qb6 With the Bishop locked out of the Q-side, Black pokes at the weakness on b2
6.Qc1 e6 7.Bd3 Bg4 8.Be2 Ngf6 9.h3 Bh5 10.O-O Rc8 11.Ne5 Bxe2 12.Nxe2 c5 13.Nxd7 Nxd7 14.dxc5 Nxc5 15.Rd1 Bd6 16.c3 O-O 17.Bf4 Be7 18.Be5 Qa6 19.Rd2 Ooops - d3 must be guarded from the Knight. The errant Bishop is the target.
19...Nd3 20.Rxd3 Qxd3 21.Nf4 Qa6 Qf5 22.Qd1 Ooops again - just not Whites day. Again its the misplaced Bishop as foil.
22...f6 23.Nxd5 23.Bd4 e5 24.Nxd5
23...exd5 24.Qxd5+ Kh8 25.Bd4 Rcd8 26.Qb3 b6 27.c4 Rc8 28.Rc1 Rc7 29.e4 Bd6 30.Qc3 Bc5 31.Qg3 Re7 32.Bxc5 bxc5 33.Rd1 Qxc4 34.Qd6 Rfe8 35.b3 Qxe4 36.Qxc5 Qb7 37.Rd3 Qc7 Queens must come off to avoid the mate. Playing a Rook down is no fun! Wayne is usually a very dangerous player - just not today.


0-1

Bill Naff (2000) - Dominick Leali (1605)
Peoria City Championship, 05/04/2009

Round 3


1.e4 c5 2.d4 Nf6 3.e5 Ng8 Now we see why Black usually plays d6 before Nf6 in the Sicilian.
4.d5 d6 5.f4 dxe5 6.fxe5 e6 7.Bb5+ Bd7 8.dxe6 After chasing the Knight back home and getting a strong center White gets a little careless. Better here is just to play it straight and exchange the Bishops and protect his center with either c4 or Nf3, depending on whether Black recaptures with the Queen or Knight
8...fxe6 Black is drinking the same Kool-Aid so nothing unusual is going happen now. But Qh4+ changes everything!
9.Nc3 Now Qh4+ is not as much fun as the QN covers e4
9...Bxb5 10.Qxd8+ Kxd8 11.Nxb5 Nc6 12.Nf3 h6 So the other White Knight can't threaten a fork on f7
13.Bf4 Not just strengthening e5 but also vacating c1 so the QR can play too.
13...Nb4 Not really threatening a fork but heading for d5. Unfortunately he's a tempo behind as his K is caught in the center.
14.O-O-O+ Kc8 Now the QR is boxed in
15.c3 Nd5 16.Bg3 Nge7 The b5N should be driven off first to avoid the nasty check on d6. This blocks the Bishops that blocks the KR. Getting untangled is always a hard task - better to not get tangled to start with.
17.Nd6+ Kc7 18.c4 Ne3 19.Rd2 Rd3 is also playable. Black can't take the g2 pawn without losing his Knight
19...N7f5 20.Bf4 Rd8 Putting the Rook on a potentially embarrassing square. As the Knights are pinned down, Black should seek space with g5, forcing White to make some decisions and getting Blacks Bishop & K-Rook in the game
21.Bxe3 Nxe3 22.Re2 Threatening the Knight but also bringing Nf7 to life
22...Bxd6 23.exd6+ Rxd6 24.Rxe3 The ending has been reached with White having a piece for a pawn. Its true the pawn is a passer, but its also isolated and an easy target.
24...Rf8 25.Rhe1 Kd7 26.b3 g5 27.R1e2 a6 28.Kc2 b5 29.Rd3 Rf5 30.Ne5+ Kc7 31.Rde3 bxc4 32.Nxc4 Rc6 Black runs out of time


1-0

Randy Crum (1500) - Drew Streitmatter (1541)
Peoria City Championship, 05/04/2009

Round 3


1.d4 e6 2.c4 Nf6 3.Nc3 Bb4 4.Bd2 Bxc3 5.Bxc3 Ne4 6.Rc1 Nxc3 7.Rxc3 b6 8.e4 c5 9.dxc5 bxc5 10.Qd6 Qb6 11.Qd2 Nc6 12.Nf3 Bb7 13.Rb3 Qc7 14.Bd3 Rd8 15.O-O d5 A good move if playable. After the complete exchange of pawns leaves the Rook in the middle of the board, White's Re1+ traps the King in the center too. Both can before clumsy targets with careless play. Castling first is the safe way to proceed.
16.Qg5 O-O 17.cxd5 exd5 18.exd5 Nd4 19.Nxd4 cxd4 20.Qh4 Rc1 h6 21.Qxd4 Rxd5 22.Qe4 g6 23.Bc4 Rh5 Ooops - Qxh2 and then Rh5+ puts Black back into the game
24.Bxf7+ Double ooops - Qxg6+ was much stronger
24...Rxf7 25.Qxg6+ Rg7 Oh my - now White has many troubles on g2 & h2
26.Qe8+ Only move to survive
26...Kh7 27.g3 again, an only move
27...Rc5 28.Qe3 Qc6 29.f3 Rc2 30.Qd3+ Kh8 31.Qd8+ Kh7 32.Qd3+ Qg6 It is Black who doesn't want a draw
33.Qe3 Rxh2 34.g4 Rc2 35.Rd1 Qh5 36.Qd3+ Qg6 seems like deja vu all over again
37.Qe3 h5 Correct - bring in the extra players
38.Rd4 Ba6 39.Rd5 Ooops hxg4 White Resigns


0-1

Peter McConaghie (1808) - Randy Crum (1500)
Peoria City Championship, 04/27/2009

Round 2


1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.d4 cxd4 5.Nxd4 a6 6.Be2 b5 7.a3 Bb7 8.f3 e6 9.Be3 Be7 10.Qd2 O-O 11.O-O Nc6 an uninteresting opening with both sides doing what they are supposed to do. The result is an even game. Lets see what the middle game brings
12.Nxc6 Bxc6 13.Na2 unusual, but the Knight is moving to b4, a2 is only a stop along the way
13...Rc8 14.Nb4 Bb7 15.Rac1 d5 time to challenge the center
16.e5 Nd7 17.Nd3 Nb6 18.Bxb6 White gives up the Bishop for the Knight. The c4 outpost for Black is too strong. Ideally, White would play b3 and keep the N out, but that leaves a backward pawn on a half open file for a target
18...Qxb6+ 19.Kh1 h6 I don't understand this move. Black should try penetrating along the c-file or bring his Q to the center with Qd4. White dark squares are weak
20.Qe1 planning to slip on over to g3 to instigate a K-side attack
20...Qd4 21.f4 Qe4 22.Qf2 Qc4 No need to retreat - Black should be trying to double his Rooks. He now given away several tempi that could have used for that purpose.
23.Ne1 Qc7 24.Qg3 Qb6 25.Bd3 to an attacking diagonal
25...a5 Its a Sicilian, White attacks on the K-side, Black attacks o the Q-side
26.f5 Bg5 27.f6 Black can't take the Rook due to the mate threat on g7
27...Qd4 Things are starting to loosen up. Both b-pawns are hanging, the Rook on c1 is attacked - time to look for combinations
28.Nf3 fxg7 Qf4 29.Nxg5 Again fxg7 would be slightly better - after King takes & NxB, White wins a pawn with the Knight desperado Nxe6
29...Qxg3 30.hxg3 hxg5 31.Bxb5 So White has won a pawn. But there are no passers & Black has plenty of space and maneuverability on the Q-side, so nothing is decided yet.
31...Rc5 32.Bd3 d4 33.Rce1 gxf6 34.Rxf6 On pawn takes Black has e5 and dangerous center pawns
34...Kg7 35.Rf2 Black threatened Rxe5 getting his pawn back
35...Rh8+ a4 is to be considered. Sometimes it is enough just to restrain your opponent
36.Kg1 Rh6 Black volunteers his Rook out of place. When you move to an awkward place, double check your calculations to be sure its not a mistake
37.b4 axb4 38.axb4 Since the other Rook is tied up on the K-side, White takes the time to create a passer
38...Rc8 39.Rd2 Taking aim at a second pawn.
39...Rch8 A bad plan - if Whites Bishop couldn't interfere it would be a good one.
40.Kf2 Rh2 41.Be4 Bxe4 42.Rxe4 After this exchange, White will win the 2nd pawn, have connected passers while Blacks Rooks are on the wrong side of the board - so Black Resigns


1-0

Drew Streitmatter (1541) - Saleem Kahn (1601)
Peoria City Championship, 04/27/2009

Round 2


1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 d6 4.Nc3 A routine developing move. But even developing moves shouldn't be played without regard to the situation. Here Black plays d6 which threatens Bg4. The cure is to either not let him play that, or develop in a way that the move lacks any real sting. The sting comes from Blacks ability to pile onto the pinned piece. So the choices seem to be c3 or h3. h3 - an extra non-developing side move, just feels wrong. So c3 should be good. Further examination of c3 shows it also permits the Q escape Qb3, ducking out of the pin with threats. For example - Bg4 5.Qb3 Na5 6.Bxf7+ K-e7 7.Qa4 Kxf7 8.Qxa5. Having said all that, it is possible that White looked at those moves and still chose the path he played, as his game is still at least even.
4...Bg4 5.Bb5 Nge7 6.Nd5 a6 7.Bxc6+ Nxc6 8.c3 So after much shuffling of pieces, the game returns to it's main theme, if not main line.
8...Na7 This move is not good. We all know Knights on the Rim are Dim. The only justification for moving to an edge square is either its a stop along the road to somewhere or it's a tactical imperative. This Knight doesn't really need to head anywhere - it's on a good post now. b4 isn't any better and can be easily chased from that square anyway. c1 to b3? Not promising. This could easily be the losing move.
9.Ne3 White too is making too many Knight moves. While e3 is a good square, d5 is a great post too. Leave him until you have to move him and develop in the mean time. I like d4 unleashing the QB better.
9...Bh5 10.Nf5 Qf6 11.d3 Bg4 12.Ne3 Be6 13.O-O Be7 14.d4 O-O 15.d5 Bd7 16.c4 Qg6 17.Qc2 f5 18.exf5 Bxf5 19.Nxf5 Rxf5 20.Be3 Excellent move. The Black QR would like to join the K-side fun with Raf8 but must stay home to protect the Knight on the Rim. It takes 2 moves to activate the Knight before the Rook can move. This move buys White lots of time.
20...Qg4 21.h3 Qg6 22.Rac1 c5 23.Qe4 b5 24.Nh4 Bxh4 25.Qxh4 Rh5 26.Qg3 Qf7 27.a3 bxc4 28.Rxc4 Qxd5 29.Rg4 Qf7 30.f4 e4 Rf5 31.f5 Rd8 32.Rxe4 Rxf5 This is the real losing move - it blunders the rim Knight on a7. Black could continue with either d5 or Nc6
33.Rxf5 Qxf5 34.Re7 Qf6 35.Rxa7 Re8 36.Bd2 d5 37.Ba5 d4 38.Rd7 c4 39.Bb6 Re7 40.Bxd4 Qf8 41.Bc5 Qe8 42.Rxe7 It ends with a pretty combination


1-0

Ron Suarez (1705) - Mike Leali (1908)
Peoria City Championship, 04/27/2009

Round 2


1.c4 Nf6 2.g3 c5 3.Bg2 Nc6 4.Nc3 e6 5.e4 Nd4 6.d3 d6 7.Be3 Be7 8.Nce2 Wrong Knight - Nge2 is better
8...Qb6 9.Qd2 O-O 10.h3 Bd7 11.Rb1 a5 Thrust & parry - White wanted b4, Black says no
12.Nf3 f4 Nxe2 13.Qxe2 Bc6 14.O-O Qc7 15.Bd2 e5 16.Nh2 As many of you know, I don't like these kinds of Knight moves unless they quickly lead to tangible results
16...b5 17.b3 bxc4 I think this releases the pressure much too soon. I'd prefer b4, giving Black the space advantage to build up Rooks on the a-file and then press a4 & axb if necessary and so own the only open line in a closed game.
18.bxc4 Rab8 19.f4 Rxb1 Giving White the only open file in a closed game.
20.Rxb1 g6 21.Qe1 a4 22.Ba5 Qd7 23.Bd2 c3 is a better square with more influence on the center. White has nothing to fear from exf4 & gxf4
23...Qc8 c7 is the better square, but Black is the higher rated player and doesn't want a draw
24.g4 exf4 25.Bxf4 Nd7 26.Bh6 Re8 27.Nf3 Bf6 28.Bf4 Ne5 This last shuffle of pieces helps Black. His Knight is now in the center, his Bishop is on a better diagonal & his Rook finally has something worth doing. But White also gained in somethings. His prodigal Knight has returned and the dark squares into the Black K-side are in his control.
29.Qd2 Qd7 30.Ne1 Bg7 31.Bh6 This trade is usually done in conjunction with an h-pawn advance or piece play against the King. One of White's advantages is the dark squares - losing this Bishop hurts White more than Black. Besides there is plenty for White to do - his rim Knight needs to find a home. N-c2-e3-d5 or Nc2-a3-b5 are possible Knight tours to wonderful squares.
31...Qe6 32.Bxg7 Kxg7 33.d4 A mistake - why in such a hurry to break up the center. Here it will break in Blacks favor. White should maintain his center, reposition his Knight and then find a way to take advantage of the b-file which he owns.
33...Nxc4 Bxe4 34.Qc3 cxd4 35.Qxd4+ Ne5 And Black nets a pawn due to the awkward position of Whites Queen & Rook
36.Rb6 Kg8 37.a3 Rc8 38.Bf1 Qf6 39.Be2 Ooops - its easy to miss a simple combination in the middle of positional complications
39...Nxg4 40.Nf3 Qxd4+ 41.Nxd4 Ne5 42.Ba6 Rc7 Only move
43.Nxc6 Rxc6 44.Rxc6 Nxc6 45.Bb5 White forces the trade of pieces to win a pawn. But instead just trades pawns as the a3 pawn can't move from attack. Trading pieces when behind only helps the stronger side consolidate his advantage.
45...Ne5 46.Bxa4 Nc4 47.Bb5 Nxa3 48.Bd3 Black is ahead by 2 pawns, there are no passers & his Knight is trapped against the side far far away. Its important in these situations to calculate the tempi accurately. Does White get to the Knight with his King or does the Black King arrive in the nick of time?
48...Kf8 49.Kf2 Ke7 50.Ke3 Kd7 51.Kd4 Kc6 arriving at the nearest escape point just in time
52.e5 d5 53.h4 h5 54.e6 An excellent try - gives Black ways to go wrong. If you have a lost position, find ways to cloud the issue
54...fxe6 55.Bxg6 Kd6 56.Bxh5 e5+ 57.Kd3 e4+ 58.Ke2 Nc4 59.Bg4 White will be looking for ways to trade his Bishop for the 2 passers.
59...Ne5 60.Bf5 Nf7 61.h5 Ke5 62.Bg6 Nh6 63.Be8 Kf4 64.Bc6 d4 65.Bb5 The idea is if Black mindlessly pushes the pawn check, White can play Bishop takes and the game is drawn
65...Nf5 66.Be8 Kg5 67.Bg6 Kf4 68.Be8 Ng3+ 69.Kd2 e3+ 70.Kd3 Kg5 e2 71.Bc6 Nxh5 72.Bf3 Ng3 73.Kxd4 Kf4 74.Bd1 Ne4 75.Kd3 Ooops - White can't lose his Bishop as when he recaptures Black grabs the opposition. Actually I don't think the King needs to do anything to draw - just shuffle the Bishop along the diagonal crossing in front of the pawn & then the pawn can not advance.
75...Nf2+ 76.Ke2 Nxd1 77.Kxd1 Kf3 78.Ke1 e2


0-1

Dominick Leali (1605) - Andrew Voss (1794)
Peoria City Championship, 04/27/2009

Round 2


1.e4 g6 2.Nf3 Bg7 3.d4 c6 4.c3 d5 5.exd5 cxd5 6.Be2 Nc6 7.O-O Bg4 8.h3 Bxf3 9.Bxf3 Qd6 10.Na3 Qb3 It looks here like white doesn't have a strong advantage, but 10.Na3 was much stronger that I thought. - AV
a6 11.Qb3 O-O-O 12.Nc2 Tit for tat. This really hands away the initiative. Development was key here. - AV
12...e5 This move looks a lot scarier that it actually is. Black's king is exposed. The pieces need to come and attack it. - AV
Agreed. White is still the choice here with dxe5. Since Blacks King is exposed White should open up the game - MR
13.c4 e4 14.cxd5 exf3 15.dxc6 Qxc6 16.gxf3 As bad as 12...e5 was, this gives Black counterplay. - AV


0-1

Andy Voss (1794) - Ron Suarez (1705)
Peoria City Championship, 04/20/2009

Round 1


1.e4 e6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 c5 4.c3 Nc6 5.Nf3 Qb6 All classical French moves
6.a3 cxd4 7.cxd4 Nh6 8.b4 Bd7 9.Bb2 Bxh6 Rc8 10.Bd3 Nf5 Na5 11.Bxf5 exf5 12.O-O Be7 13.Nc3 Be6 14.Rc1 O-O 15.Na4 Qd8 16.Nc5 an impressive post if he weren't so easily dislodged.
16...b6 17.Nxe6 fxe6 Trading the once powerfully posted Knight for a big pawn - the Knight should go to e3-f5 and probe the position before giving himself up for the Bishop.
18.Qa4 Qd7 19.Qb3 h6 20.Ne1 Ooops - the glue that holds White's position together, the d-pawn is now dust.
20...Nxd4 21.Qh3 Panicking much too quickly - just play the Queen to a safe square that guards e2 and the faux paux only costs a pawn - maybe theres time to save the game.
21...Ne2+ 22.Kh1 Nxc1 23.g4 d4 Correct. Respond to an attack on the wing by play in the center. Black cuts off the Bishop from the K-side.
24.gxf5 Qd5+ 25.Ng2 Ne2 26.Qg4 Rc2 27.f6 The only try left for White, maybe Black will blunder the game back.
27...Bxf6 Yes - Black is up considerably in material - time to give a little back to get rid of the mate threat and activate his Rook.
28.exf6 Rxf6 29.Ba1 Qf3 30.Qxf3 Rxf3 31.Nh4 Rxa3 32.Rd1 Rc1 33.Rxc1 Nxc1 34.Bxd4 The smoke clears and Black has an exchange and 2 pawns, but White still has moves to play.
34...Nd3 35.b5 Rb3 36.Ng6 Rxb5 Now 3 pawns, including a pair of passers.
37.Ne7+ Kf7 38.Nc8 Rb1+ 39.Kg2 Ne1+ 40.Kg3 Nc2 41.Be5 a5 42.Nd6+ Kg6 43.Nc4 a4 44.Nd2 Rg1+ 45.Kf3 a3 46.Bc3 a2 47.Nc4 b5 Black relentlessly pushed his advantage once White blundered so there was no chance to regroup. Finally White Resigns.


0-1

Wayne Zimmerle (1720) - Dominick Leali (1605)
Peoria City Championship, 04/20/2009

Round 1


1.d4 Nf6 2.Nc3 e6 3.Bg5 Bb4 4.e4 h6 5.Bh4 When you pin a Knight with your Bishop in the opening, you are committing to making the exchange if necessary. Here it is necessary in order to save the e4 pawn.
5...g5 6.Bg3 Nxe4 7.Qf3 Bxc3+ Logical would be d5 in order to develop as fast as possible. Black has his material, he shouldn't fall behind any further in time. There is no hurry to exchange.
8.bxc3 Nxg3 9.hxg3 Nc6 10.Bd3 d5 11.Ne2 e5 Perhaps a little early to open up the center with the King position still undecided.
12.Bb5 e4 13.Qe3 Bd7 14.c4 Correctly hitting at the base of the pawn chain.
14...a6 15.Ba4 Nb4 16.Bxd7+ Qxd7 17.Qb3 a5 18.a3 dxc4 19.Qxc4 Qc6 Forcing the exchange of Queens.
20.Qxc6+ Nxc6 21.Rb1 O-O-O 22.c3 Rd6 23.Kd2 f5 Ne5 24.Rb5 Rf8 25.Ke3 Rff6 b6 26.f4 exf3 gxf4 27.gxf3 Undoubling the pawns
27...a4 Safer would be b6. Now he will have to be guarded by pieces.
28.f4 gxf4+ 29.Kxf4 Nxf4 Ne7 30.Kf3 Rb6 31.Ra5 Ra6 32.Re5 Rfe6 33.Rb5 Rab6 34.Ra5 Ra6 35.Rb5 Rab6 36.Ra5 Ra6 37.Rb5 Rab6 Draw by repetition. neither side wants to give up his current position. But here Black is up a clear pawn and so he needs to solidify his gains. Active pieces are worth a pawn, and if Black loses a pawn he is still materially even. So 34 or 36 Rb3 looks like a good try, followed up by Nd5 and possibly Rb2. In any case it looks like it would be hard for White to not give the just captured pawn back in a hurry. Wayne's reputation may have saved him half a point. A good game by Black in any event.


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